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Ghostwriting Services GHOST WRITER, INC. Karen S. Cole Or, you don’t even have time to write a blog post, let alone a whole book. These scribes-for-hire work with you to turn your ideas into manuscript form, either for a publishing house or as a work you can self-publish.“Ghostwriting as a field has been growing dramatically because people are hearing about this person, a ghostwriter, who can work magic and create a book out of nothing. I think sometimes people have the wrong impression of what a ghostwriter does,” says Marcia Layton Turner, ghostwriter and founder of the Association of Ghostwriters, a membership organization for ghostwriters and other book collaborators. So, before you shell out big bucks to have someone pen the Great American Business Book, take some advice from the ghostwriters themselves to make sure the venture is a success. Ghostwriter Jenna Glatzer, whose credits include , which she wrote with Ironman competitor Scott Rigsby, asks many questions when she interviews prospective clients. She usually looks for a business or important personal reason for the project. A book can be a great credibility-building and marketing tool to help the author sell products or services, book speaking engagements, or accomplish some other goal. Authors who simply want their name on a bestseller list without understanding all of the factors—including sales, marketing and distribution–that go into landing on those lists, are often disappointed.“When you’re working with a ghostwriter, if your goal is strictly ‘I want to make a lot of money off this book,’ that’s not necessarily an easy thing to do. You’re usually going to pay the ghostwriter the bulk of the advance to write the book,” she says. Groups like the Association of Ghostwriters and the American Society of Journalists and Authors’ Freelance Writers Search are two places to find experienced ghosts. Glatzer suggests looking for writers who have written books in the genre you’re targeting and calling previous collaborators to find out about their experiences working with the writer. with Bill Mc Gowan, recommends interviewing at least three ghostwriters to compare styles and chemistry. Embarking on such a big project is “a little like forming a long-term romantic relationship,” she says. Not that anything inappropriate will go on, but you’ll be working closely with this person over a period of months, she says. That’s tough to do when you can’t stand each other. An experienced ghostwriter will help you define the scope of the project, including the length of the manuscript and the components that will be included in the final manuscript. However, writing a book with a ghostwriter is a collaborative process, Turner says. You can’t just hire the writer and expect them to produce a book—guidance and input need to come from you, she says. So, be prepared to devote the time necessary for your part of the collaboration, which may take several months or more, she says. It’s a good idea to work on an outline first so you both understand the overall direction of the book and how you’ll organize the material. Your ghostwriter will likely want to have regular phone calls with you to get direction and input on the book’s contents. It’s important to define whether the ghost will also conduct additional research or need to provide other services, such as helping with graphics or photography sourcing or creating an index, which are not typically part of a ghostwriter’s responsibilities. While some companies claim they can deliver a finished book for a few thousand dollars or within a month or two, that’s not likely to be anything you’d want representing you or your brand, Bowman says. Good ghosts aren’t cheap: Bowman says the bottom-line number for a thorough book proposal, which is necessary for most writers to sell their books to publishing houses, from an experienced ghostwriter is somewhere around ,000 to ,000. When it comes to manuscripts, Glatzer estimates that less experienced ghostwriters fall into the ,000 to ,000 range, while intermediate-level ghosts can go as high as ,000 or more. A-list writers with serious credentials can command upward of ,000. “A small list of ghostwriters are consistently in the six-figure range,” she says. Be sure to define details such as the length of the book, how many rounds of revisions are included, and the charges that apply if the scope of work changes. The Editorial Freelancers Association, a membership organization for writers and editors, also publishes a list of rough editorial rate guidelines. Once you’ve reached an agreement on the project scope and budget, it’s critical to have an agreement that spells out the relationship. In addition to the specifics of the working relationship, it’s a good idea to work out who will hold the copyright to the material, Bowman says. Unless you have a written agreement that states otherwise, if you write the book together you typically both hold the copyright. Once you’ve hired your writer, set milestone deadlines to keep the project moving along and work together to refine information and voice. The ghostwriter and author relationship works best when it’s collaborative and open, Bowman says. Expect to have some back-and-forth, especially in the beginning—it’s unrealistic to expect the writer to get the tone and content perfect on the first draft. Then, let the writer write.“I specialize in books and what happens is people think they can write, but they don’t understand what it takes to make a book commercial, so they get in their own way and they really obstruct the process,” says Bowman. When the collaboration is a good fit, the writer uses the expert’s words to create a work that people want to read. Or other type of freelance ghostwriter, book coach or editor through GWI. You will find the best professional ghostwriting services for your dreams and desires right here. You're guaranteed to get a published, affordable and most importantly the best book ghostwriter through Ghost Writer, Inc. Find screenplay writing services.

Ghostwriting Services Award-Winning/Bestselling Writers June, as dusk fell outside Tony Schwartz’s sprawling house, on a leafy back road in Riverdale, New York, he pulled out his laptop and caught up with the day’s big news: Donald J. As Schwartz watched a video of the speech, he began to feel personally implicated. Trump, facing a crowd that had gathered in the lobby of Trump Tower, on Fifth Avenue, laid out his qualifications, saying, “We need a leader that wrote ‘The Art of the Deal.’ ” If that was so, Schwartz thought, then he, not Trump, should be running. Schwartz dashed off a tweet: “Many thanks Donald Trump for suggesting I run for President, based on the fact that I wrote ‘The Art of the Deal.’ ”Schwartz had ghostwritten Trump’s 1987 breakthrough memoir, earning a joint byline on the cover, half of the book’s five-hundred-thousand-dollar advance, and half of the royalties. The book was a phenomenal success, spending forty-eight weeks on the best-seller list, thirteen of them at No. More than a million copies have been bought, generating several million dollars in royalties. The book expanded Trump’s renown far beyond New York City, making him an emblem of the successful tycoon. Edward Kosner, the former editor and publisher of , where Schwartz worked as a writer at the time, says, “Tony created Trump. Frankenstein.”Starting in late 1985, Schwartz spent eighteen months with Trump—camping out in his office, joining him on his helicopter, tagging along at meetings, and spending weekends with him at his Manhattan apartment and his Florida estate. During that period, Schwartz felt, he had got to know him better than almost anyone else outside the Trump family. Until Schwartz posted the tweet, though, he had not spoken publicly about Trump for decades. It had never been his ambition to be a ghostwriter, and he had been glad to move on. But, as he watched a replay of the new candidate holding forth for forty-five minutes, he noticed something strange: over the decades, Trump appeared to have convinced himself that he written the book. Schwartz recalls thinking, “If he could lie about that on Day One—when it was so easily refuted—he is likely to lie about anything.”It seemed improbable that Trump’s campaign would succeed, so Schwartz told himself that he needn’t worry much. But, as Trump denounced Mexican immigrants as “rapists,” near the end of the speech, Schwartz felt anxious. He had spent hundreds of hours observing Trump firsthand, and felt that he had an unusually deep understanding of what he regarded as Trump’s beguiling strengths and disqualifying weaknesses. Many Americans, however, saw Trump as a charmingly brash entrepreneur with an unfailing knack for business—a mythical image that Schwartz had helped create. “It pays to trust your instincts,” Trump says in the book, adding that he was set to make hundreds of millions of dollars after buying a hotel that he hadn’t even walked through. In the subsequent months, as Trump defied predictions by establishing himself as the front-runner for the Republican nomination, Schwartz’s desire to set the record straight grew. He had long since left journalism to launch the Energy Project, a consulting firm that promises to improve employees’ productivity by helping them boost their “physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual” morale. It was a successful company, with clients such as Facebook, and Schwartz’s colleagues urged him to avoid the political fray. It wasn’t because of Trump’s ideology—Schwartz doubted that he had one. The problem was Trump’s personality, which he considered pathologically impulsive and self-centered. Schwartz thought about publishing an article describing his reservations about Trump, but he hesitated, knowing that, since he’d cashed in on the flattering “Art of the Deal,” his credibility and his motives would be seen as suspect. Schwartz decided that if he kept mum and Trump was elected he’d never forgive himself. In June, he agreed to break his silence and give his first candid interview about the Trump he got to know while acting as his Boswell.“I put lipstick on a pig,” he said. “I feel a deep sense of remorse that I contributed to presenting Trump in a way that brought him wider attention and made him more appealing than he is.” He went on, “I genuinely believe that if Trump wins and gets the nuclear codes there is an excellent possibility it will lead to the end of civilization.”If he were writing “The Art of the Deal” today, Schwartz said, it would be a very different book with a very different title. Asked what he would call it, he answered, “The Sociopath.”The idea of Trump writing an autobiography didn’t originate with either Trump or Schwartz. It began with Si Newhouse, the media magnate whose company, Advance Publications, owned Random House at the time, and continues to own Condé Nast, the parent company of this magazine. “It was very definitely, and almost uniquely, Si Newhouse’s idea,” Peter Osnos, who edited the book, recalls. , which Condé Nast also owns, had published a cover story on Trump, and Newhouse noticed that newsstand sales had been unusually strong. Newhouse called Trump about the project, then visited him to discuss it. Random House continued the pursuit with a series of meetings. At one point, Howard Kaminsky, who ran Random House then, wrapped a thick Russian novel in a dummy cover that featured a photograph of Trump looking like a conquering hero; at the top was Trump’s name, in large gold block lettering. Kaminsky recalls that Trump was pleased by the mockup, but had one suggestion: “Please make my name much bigger.” After securing the half-million-dollar advance, Trump signed a contract. Around this time, Schwartz, who was one of the leading young magazine writers of the day, stopped by Trump’s office, in Trump Tower. In 1985, he’d published a piece in called “A Different Kind of Donald Trump Story,” which portrayed him not as a brilliant mogul but as a ham-fisted thug who had unsuccessfully tried to evict rent-controlled and rent-stabilized tenants from a building that he had bought on Central Park South. Trump’s efforts—which included a plan to house homeless people in the building in order to harass the tenants—became what Schwartz described as a “fugue of failure, a farce of fumbling and bumbling.” An accompanying cover portrait depicted Trump as unshaven, unpleasant-looking, and shiny with sweat. Yet, to Schwartz’s amazement, Trump loved the article. He hung the cover on a wall of his office, and sent a fan note to Schwartz, on his gold-embossed personal stationery. “Everybody seems to have read it,” Trump enthused in the note, which Schwartz has kept.“I was shocked,” Schwartz told me. “Trump didn’t fit any model of human being I’d ever met. He was obsessed with publicity, and he didn’t care what you wrote.” He went on, “Trump only takes two positions. Either you’re a scummy loser, liar, whatever, or you’re the greatest. He wanted to be seen as a tough guy, and he loved being on the cover.” Schwartz wrote him back, saying, “Of all the people I’ve written about over the years, you are certainly the best sport.”And so Schwartz had returned for more, this time to conduct an interview for . But to his frustration Trump kept making cryptic, monosyllabic statements. “He mysteriously wouldn’t answer my questions,” Schwartz said. After twenty minutes, he said, Trump explained that he didn’t want to reveal anything new about himself—he had just signed a lucrative book deal and needed to save his best material.“What kind of book? ” Schwartz said.“My autobiography,” Trump replied.“You’re only thirty-eight—you don’t have one yet! He knew that he would be making a Faustian bargain. ” Schwartz joked.“Yeah, I know,” Trump said.“If I were you,” Schwartz recalls telling him, “I’d write a book called ‘The Art of the Deal.’ something people would be interested in.”“You’re right,” Trump agreed. A lifelong liberal, he was hardly an admirer of Trump’s ruthless and single-minded pursuit of profit. “It was one of a number of times in my life when I was divided between the Devil and the higher side,” he told me. He had grown up in a bourgeois, intellectual family in Manhattan, and had attended élite private schools, but he was not as wealthy as some of his classmates—and, unlike many of them, he had no trust fund. “But my parents made it clear: ‘You’re on your own.’ ” Around the time Trump made his offer, Schwartz’s wife, Deborah Pines, became pregnant with their second daughter, and he worried that the family wouldn’t fit into their Manhattan apartment, whose mortgage was already too high. “I thought money would keep me safe and secure—or that was my rationalization.” At the same time, he knew that if he took Trump’s money and adopted Trump’s voice his journalism career would be badly damaged. He told Trump that if he would give him half the advance and half the book’s royalties he’d take the job. His heroes were such literary nonfiction writers as Tom Wolfe, John Mc Phee, and David Halberstam. Such terms are unusually generous for a ghostwriter. Literally, the term was invented to describe what I did.” Soon Schwartz thought that “The Art of the Deal” would be an easy project. Trump, despite having a reputation as a tough negotiator, agreed on the spot. The book’s structure would be simple: he’d chronicle half a dozen or so of Trump’s biggest real-estate deals, dispense some bromides about how to succeed in business, and fill in Trump’s life story. For research, he planned to interview Trump on a series of Saturday mornings. After Trump gave him a tour of his marble-and-gilt apartment atop Trump Tower—which, to Schwartz, looked unlived-in, like the lobby of a hotel—they began to talk. But the discussion was soon hobbled by what Schwartz regards as one of Trump’s most essential characteristics: “He has no attention span.”In those days, Schwartz recalls, Trump was generally affable with reporters, offering short, amusingly immodest quotes on demand. Trump had been forthcoming with him during the needed to provide him with sustained, thoughtful recollections. He asked Trump to describe his childhood in detail. After sitting for only a few minutes in his suit and tie, Trump became impatient and irritable. He looked fidgety, Schwartz recalls, “like a kindergartner who can’t sit still in a classroom.” Even when Schwartz pressed him, Trump seemed to remember almost nothing of his youth, and made it clear that he was bored. Far more quickly than Schwartz had expected, Trump ended the meeting. Schwartz tried to limit the sessions to smaller increments of time, but Trump’s contributions remained oddly truncated and superficial.“Trump has been written about a thousand ways from Sunday, but this fundamental aspect of who he is doesn’t seem to be fully understood,” Schwartz told me. “It’s implicit in a lot of what people write, but it’s never explicit—or, at least, I haven’t seen it. ” Schwartz trailed off, shaking his head in amazement. And that is that it’s impossible to keep him focussed on any topic, other than his own self-aggrandizement, for more than a few minutes, and even then . He regards Trump’s inability to concentrate as alarming in a Presidential candidate. That’s what I do.”But Schwartz believes that Trump’s short attention span has left him with “a stunning level of superficial knowledge and plain ignorance.” He said, “That’s why he so prefers TV as his first news source—information comes in easily digestible sound bites.” He added, “I seriously doubt that Trump has ever read a book straight through in his adult life.” During the eighteen months that he observed Trump, Schwartz said, he never saw a book on Trump’s desk, or elsewhere in his office, or in his apartment. “If he had to be briefed on a crisis in the Situation Room, it’s impossible to imagine him paying attention over a long period of time,” he said. Other journalists have noticed Trump’s apparent lack of interest in reading. In a recent phone interview, Trump told me that, to the contrary, he has the skill that matters most in a crisis: the ability to forge compromises. In May, Megyn Kelly, of Fox News, asked him to name his favorite book, other than the Bible or “The Art of the Deal.” Trump picked the 1929 novel “All Quiet on the Western Front.” Evidently suspecting that many years had elapsed since he’d read it, Kelly asked Trump to talk about the most recent book he’d read. The reason he touted “The Art of the Deal” in his announcement, he explained, was that he believes that recent Presidents have lacked his toughness and finesse: “Look at the trade deficit with China. “I read passages, I read areas, I’ll read chapters—I don’t have the time,” Trump said. As noted recently, this attitude is not shared by most U. Presidents, including Barack Obama, a habitual consumer of current books, and George W. Bush, who reportedly engaged in a fiercely competitive book-reading contest with his political adviser Karl Rove. Trump’s first wife, Ivana, famously claimed that Trump kept a copy of Adolf Hitler’s collected speeches, “My New Order,” in a cabinet beside his bed. “I thought he would find it interesting,” Davis told her. “Growing desperate, Schwartz devised a strategy for trapping Trump into giving more material. He made plans to spend the weekend with Trump at Mar-a-Lago, his mansion in Palm Beach, where there would be fewer distractions. As they chatted in the garden, Ivana icily walked by, clearly annoyed that Schwartz was competing for her husband’s limited free time. Long before lunch on Saturday, Schwartz recalls, Trump “essentially threw a fit.” He stood up and announced that he couldn’t stand any more questions. Schwartz went to his room, called his literary agent, Kathy Robbins, and told her that he couldn’t do the book. (Robbins confirms this.) As Schwartz headed back to New York, though, he came up with another plan. He would propose eavesdropping on Trump’s life by following him around on the job and, more important, by listening in on his office phone calls. That way, extracting extended reflections from Trump would not be required. When Schwartz presented the idea to Trump, he loved it. Almost every day from then on, Schwartz sat about eight feet away from him in the Trump Tower office, listening on an extension of Trump’s phone line. Schwartz says that none of the bankers, lawyers, brokers, and reporters who called Trump realized that they were being monitored. The calls usually didn’t last long, and Trump’s assistant facilitated the conversation-hopping. While he was talking with someone, she often came in with a Post-it note informing him of the next caller on hold.“He was playing people,” Schwartz recalls. On the phone with business associates, Trump would flatter, bully, and occasionally get mad, but always in a calculated way. Before the discussion ended, Trump would “share the news of his latest success,” Schwartz says. Instead of saying goodbye at the end of a call, Trump customarily signed off with “You’re the greatest! ” There was not a single call that Trump deemed too private for Schwartz to hear. “If he could have had three hundred thousand people listening in, he would have been even happier.”This year, Schwartz has heard some argue that there must be a more thoughtful and nuanced version of Donald Trump that he is keeping in reserve for after the campaign. “There is no private Trump.” This is not a matter of hindsight. While working on “The Art of the Deal,” Schwartz kept a journal in which he expressed his amazement at Trump’s personality, writing that Trump seemed driven entirely by a need for public attention. “All he is is ‘stomp, stomp, stomp’—recognition from outside, bigger, more, a whole series of things that go nowhere in particular,” he observed, on October 21, 1986. But, as he noted in the journal a few days later, “the book will be far more successful if Trump is a sympathetic character—even weirdly sympathetic—than if he is just hateful or, worse yet, a one-dimensional blowhard.”Eavesdropping solved the interview problem, but it presented a new one. After hearing Trump’s discussions about business on the phone, Schwartz asked him brief follow-up questions. He then tried to amplify the material he got from Trump by calling others involved in the deals. But their accounts often directly conflicted with Trump’s. “More than anyone else I have ever met, Trump has the ability to convince himself that whatever he is saying at any given moment is true, or sort of true, or at least to be true.” Often, Schwartz said, the lies that Trump told him were about money—“how much he had paid for something, or what a building he owned was worth, or how much one of his casinos was earning when it was actually on its way to bankruptcy.” Trump bragged that he paid only eight million dollars for Mar-a-Lago, but omitted that he bought a nearby strip of beach for a record sum. After gossip columns reported, erroneously, that Prince Charles was considering buying several apartments in Trump Tower, Trump implied that he had no idea where the rumor had started. (“It certainly didn’t hurt us,” he says, in “The Art of the Deal.”) Wayne Barrett, a reporter for the , later revealed that Trump himself had planted the story with journalists. Schwartz also suspected that Trump engaged in such media tricks, and asked him about a story making the rounds—that Trump often called up news outlets using a pseudonym. As Schwartz recalls, he smirked and said, “You like that, do you? He had a complete lack of conscience about it.” Since most people are “constrained by the truth,” Trump’s indifference to it “gave him a strange advantage.”When challenged about the facts, Schwartz says, Trump would often double down, repeat himself, and grow belligerent. This quality was recently on display after Trump posted on Twitter a derogatory image of Hillary Clinton that contained a six-pointed star lifted from a white-supremacist Web site. Campaign staffers took the image down, but two days later Trump angrily defended it, insisting that there was no anti-Semitic implication. People want to believe that something is the biggest and the greatest and the most spectacular. It’s an innocent form of exaggeration—and it’s a very effective form of promotion.” Schwartz now disavows the passage. In his journal, Schwartz describes the process of trying to make Trump’s voice palatable in the book. Whenever “the thin veneer of Trump’s vanity is challenged,” Schwartz says, he overreacts—not an ideal quality in a head of state. “Deceit,” he told me, is never “innocent.” He added, “ ‘Truthful hyperbole’ is a contradiction in terms. It was kind of “a trick,” he writes, to mimic Trump’s blunt, staccato, no-apologies delivery while making him seem almost boyishly appealing. Other people paint beautifully on canvas or write wonderful poetry. That’s how I get my kicks.” Schwartz now laughs at this depiction of Trump as a devoted artisan. “One of the most deep and basic needs he has is to prove that ‘I’m richer than you.’ ” As for the idea that making deals is a form of poetry, Schwartz says, “He was incapable of saying something like that—it wouldn’t even be in his vocabulary.” He saw Trump as driven not by a pure love of dealmaking but by an insatiable hunger for “money, praise, and celebrity.” Often, after spending the day with Trump, and watching him pile one hugely expensive project atop the next, like a circus performer spinning plates, Schwartz would go home and tell his wife, “He’s a living black hole! When Schwartz began writing “The Art of the Deal,” he realized that he needed to put an acceptable face on Trump’s loose relationship with the truth. Writing in Trump’s voice, he explained to the reader, “I play to people’s fantasies. One strategy was to make it appear that Trump was just having fun at the office. ”Schwartz reminded himself that he was being paid to tell Trump’s story, not his own, but the more he worked on the project the more disturbing he found it. “I try not to take any of what’s happened too seriously,” Trump says in the book. In his journal, he describes the hours he spent with Trump as “draining” and “deadening.” Schwartz told me that Trump’s need for attention is “completely compulsive,” and that his bid for the Presidency is part of a continuum. “The real excitement is playing the game.”In his journal, Schwartz wrote, “Trump stands for many of the things I abhor: his willingness to run over people, the gaudy, tacky, gigantic obsessions, the absolute lack of interest in anything beyond power and money.” Looking back at the text now, Schwartz says, “I created a character far more winning than Trump actually is.” The first line of the book is an example. “He’s managed to keep increasing the dose for forty years,” Schwartz said. After he’d spent decades as a tabloid titan, “the only thing left was running for President. If he could run for emperor of the world, he would.”Rhetorically, Schwartz’s aim in “The Art of the Deal” was to present Trump as the hero of every chapter, but, after looking into some of his supposedly brilliant deals, Schwartz concluded that there were cases in which there was no way to make Trump look good. So he sidestepped unflattering incidents and details. “I didn’t consider it my job to investigate,” he says. Schwartz also tried to avoid the strong whiff of cronyism that hovered over some deals. In his 1986 journal, he describes what a challenge it was to “put his best foot forward” in writing about one of Trump’s first triumphs: his development, starting in 1975, of the Grand Hyatt Hotel, on the site of the former Commodore Hotel, next to Grand Central Terminal. In order to afford the hotel, Trump required an extremely large tax abatement. Richard Ravitch, who was then in charge of the agency that had the authority to grant such tax breaks to developers, recalls that he declined to grant the abatement, and Trump got “so unpleasant I had to tell him to get out.” Trump got it anyway, largely because key city officials had received years of donations from his father, Fred Trump, who was a major real-estate developer in Queens. Wayne Barrett, whose reporting for the informed his definitive 1991 book, “Trump: The Deals and the Downfall,” says, “It was all Fred’s political connections that created the abatement.” In addition, Trump snookered rivals into believing that he had an exclusive option from the city on the project, when he didn’t. Trump also deceived his partner in the deal, Jay Pritzker, the head of the Hyatt Hotel chain. Pritzker had rejected an unfavorable term proposed by Trump, but at the closing Trump forced it through, knowing that Pritzker was on a mountain in Nepal and could not be reached. Schwartz wrote in his journal that “almost everything” about the hotel deal had “an immoral cast.” But as the ghostwriter he was “trying hard to find my way around” behavior that he considered “if not reprehensible, at least morally questionable.”Many tall tales that Trump told Schwartz contained a kernel of truth but made him out to be cleverer than he was. One of Trump’s favorite stories was about how he had tricked the company that owned Holiday Inn into becoming his partner in an Atlantic City casino. Trump claimed that he had quieted executives’ fears of construction delays by ordering his construction supervisor to make a vacant lot that he owned look like “the most active construction site in the history of the world.” As Trump tells it in “The Art of the Deal,” there were so many dump trucks and bulldozers pushing around dirt and filling holes that had just been dug that when Holiday Inn executives visited the site it “looked as if we were in the midst of building the Grand Coulee Dam.” The stunt, Trump claimed, pushed the deal through. After the book came out, though, a consultant for Trump’s casinos, Al Glasgow, who is now deceased, told Schwartz, “It never happened.” There may have been one or two trucks, but not the fleet that made it a great story. Schwartz tamped down some of Trump’s swagger, but plenty of it remained. The manuscript that Random House published was, depending on your perspective, either entertainingly insightful or shamelessly self-aggrandizing. To borrow a title from Norman Mailer, who frequently attended prizefights at Trump’s Atlantic City hotels, the book could have been called “Advertisements for Myself.”In 2005, Timothy L. O’Brien, an award-winning journalist who is currently the executive editor of Bloomberg View, published “Trump Nation,” a meticulous investigative biography. (Trump unsuccessfully sued him for libel.) O’Brien has taken a close look at “The Art of the Deal,” and he told me that it might be best characterized as a “nonfiction work of fiction.” Trump’s life story, as told by Schwartz, honestly chronicled a few setbacks, such as Trump’s disastrous 1983 purchase of the New Jersey Generals, a football team in the flailing United States Football League. But O’Brien believes that Trump used the book to turn almost every step of his life, both personal and professional, into a “glittering fable.”Some of the falsehoods in “The Art of the Deal” are minor. upended Trump’s claims that Ivana had been a “top model” and an alternate on the Czech Olympic ski team. Barrett notes that in “The Art of the Deal” Trump describes his father as having been born in New Jersey to Swedish parents; in fact, he was born in the Bronx to German parents. (Decades later, Trump spread falsehoods about Obama’s origins, claiming it was possible that the President was born in Africa.)In “The Art of the Deal,” Trump portrays himself as a warm family man with endless admirers. He praises Ivana’s taste and business skill—“I said you can’t bet against Ivana, and she proved me right.” But Schwartz noticed little warmth or communication between Trump and Ivana, and he later learned that while “The Art of the Deal” was being written Trump began an affair with Marla Maples, who became his second wife. (He divorced Ivana in 1992.) As far as Schwartz could tell, Trump spent very little time with his family and had no close friends. literally standing by you to the death.” Cohn, who in the fifties assisted Senator Joseph Mc Carthy in his vicious crusade against Communism, was closeted. In “The Art of the Deal,” Trump describes Roy Cohn, his personal lawyer, in the warmest terms, calling him “the sort of guy who’d be there at your hospital bed . He felt abandoned by Trump when he became fatally ill from , and said, “Donald pisses ice water.” Schwartz says of Trump, “He’d like people when they were helpful, and turn on them when they weren’t. He’s a transactional man—it was all about what you could do for him.”According to Barrett, among the most misleading aspects of “The Art of the Deal” was the idea that Trump made it largely on his own, with only minimal help from his father, Fred. Barrett, in his book, notes that Trump once declared, “The working man likes me because he knows I didn’t inherit what I’ve built,” and that in “The Art of the Deal” he derides wealthy heirs as members of “the Lucky Sperm Club.”Trump’s self-portrayal as a Horatio Alger figure has buttressed his populist appeal in 2016. Fred’s fortune, based on his ownership of middle-income properties, wasn’t glamorous, but it was sizable: in 2003, a few years after Fred died, Trump and his siblings reportedly sold some of their father’s real-estate holdings for half a billion dollars. In “The Art of the Deal,” Trump cites his father as “the most important influence on me,” but in his telling his father’s main legacy was teaching him the importance of “toughness.” Beyond that, Schwartz says, Trump “barely talked about his father—he didn’t want his success to be seen as having anything to do with him.” But when Barrett investigated he found that Trump’s father was instrumental in his son’s rise, financially and politically. In the book, Trump says that “my energy and my enthusiasm” explain how, as a twenty-nine-year-old with few accomplishments, he acquired the Grand Hyatt Hotel. Barrett reports, however, that Trump’s father had to co-sign the many contracts that the deal required. He also lent Trump seven and a half million dollars to get started as a casino owner in Atlantic City; at one point, when Trump couldn’t meet payments on other loans, his father tried to tide him over by sending a lawyer to buy some three million dollars’ worth of gambling chips. Barrett told me, “Donald did make some smart moves himself, particularly in assembling the site for the Trump Tower. That was a stroke of genius.” Nonetheless, he said, “The notion that he’s a self-made man is a joke. But I guess they couldn’t call the book ‘The Art of My Father’s Deals.’ ”The other key myth perpetuated by “The Art of the Deal” was that Trump’s intuitions about business were almost flawless. “The book helped fuel the notion that he couldn’t fail,” Barrett said. But, unbeknown to Schwartz and the public, by late 1987, when the book came out, Trump was heading toward what Barrett calls “simultaneous personal and professional self-destruction.” O’Brien agrees that during the next several years Trump’s life unravelled. The divorce from Ivana reportedly cost him twenty-five million dollars. Meanwhile, he was in the midst of what O’Brien calls “a crazy shopping spree that resulted in unmanageable debt.” He was buying the Plaza Hotel and also planning to erect “the tallest building in the world,” on the former rail yards that he had bought on the West Side. In 1987, the city denied him permission to construct such a tall skyscraper, but in “The Art of the Deal” he brushed off this failure with a one-liner: “I can afford to wait.” O’Brien says, “The reality is that he afford to wait. He was telling the media that the carrying costs were three million dollars, when in fact they were more like twenty million.” Trump was also building a third casino in Atlantic City, the Taj, which he promised would be “the biggest casino in history.” He bought the Eastern Air Lines shuttle that operated out of New York, Boston, and Washington, rechristening it the Trump Shuttle, and acquired a giant yacht, the Trump Princess. “He was on a total run of complete and utter self-absorption,” Barrett says, adding, “It’s kind of like now.”Schwartz said that when he was writing the book “the greatest percentage of Trump’s assets was in casinos, and he made it sound like each casino was more successful than the last. But every one of them was failing.” He went on, “I think he was just spinning. I don’t think he could have believed it at the time. He had to have been terrified.”In 1992, the journalist David Cay Johnston published a book about casinos, “Temples of Chance,” and cited a net-worth statement from 1990 that assessed Trump’s personal wealth. It showed that Trump owed nearly three hundred million dollars more to his creditors than his assets were worth. The next year, his company was forced into bankruptcy—the first of six such instances. But in “The Art of the Deal,” O’Brien told me, “Trump shrewdly and unabashedly promoted an image of himself as a dealmaker nonpareil who could always get the best out of every situation—and who can now deliver America from its malaise.” This idealized version was presented to an exponentially larger audience, O’Brien noted, when Mark Burnett, the reality-television producer, read “The Art of the Deal” and decided to base a new show on it, “The Apprentice,” with Trump as the star. The first season of the show, which premièred in 2004, opens with Trump in the back of a limousine, boasting, “I’ve mastered the art of the deal, and I’ve turned the name Trump into the highest-quality brand.” An image of the book’s cover flashes onscreen as Trump explains that, as the “master,” he is now seeking an apprentice. O’Brien said, “ ‘The Apprentice’ is mythmaking on steroids. There’s a straight line from the book to the show to the 2016 campaign.”It took Schwartz a little more than a year to write “The Art of the Deal.” In the spring of 1987, he sent the manuscript to Trump, who returned it to him shortly afterward. 1 best-seller, and one of the best-selling business books of all time. There were a few red marks made with a fat-tipped Magic Marker, most of which deleted criticisms that Trump had made of powerful individuals he no longer wanted to offend, such as Lee Iacocca. Some say it was the best-selling business book ever.” (It is not.) Howard Kaminsky, the former Random House head, laughed and said, “Trump didn’t write a postcard for us! Otherwise, Schwartz says, Trump changed almost nothing. ”Trump was far more involved in the book’s promotion. In my phone interview with Trump, he initially said of Schwartz, “Tony was very good. He wooed booksellers and made one television appearance after another. He was the co-author.” But he dismissed Schwartz’s account of the writing process. He publicly promised to donate his cut of the book’s royalties to charity. He even made a surprise trip to New Hampshire, where he stirred additional publicity by floating the possibility that he might run for President. In December of 1987, a month after the book was published, Trump hosted an extravagant book party in the pink marble atrium of Trump Tower. Klieg lights lit a red carpet outside the building. Inside, nearly a thousand guests, in black tie, were served champagne and fed slices of a giant cake replica of Trump Tower, which was wheeled in by a parade of women waving red sparklers. The boxing promoter Don King greeted the crowd in a floor-length mink coat, and the comedian Jackie Mason introduced Donald and Ivana with the words “Here comes the king and queen! ” Trump toasted Schwartz, saying teasingly that he had at least tried to teach him how to make money. Schwartz got more of an education the next day, when he and Trump spoke on the phone. After chatting briefly about the party, Trump informed Schwartz that, as his ghostwriter, he owed him for half the event’s cost, which was in the six figures. “He wanted me to split the cost of entertaining his list of nine hundred second-rate celebrities? ” Schwartz had, in fact, learned a few things from watching Trump. He drastically negotiated down the amount that he agreed to pay, to a few thousand dollars, and then wrote Trump a letter promising to write a check not to Trump but to a charity of Schwartz’s choosing. In the past seven years, Trump has promised to give millions of dollars to charity, but reporters for the Washington Not long after the discussion of the party bills, Trump approached Schwartz about writing a sequel, for which Trump had been offered a seven-figure advance. This time, however, he offered Schwartz only a third of the profits. He pointed out that, because the advance was much bigger, the payout would be, too. Feeling deeply alienated, he instead wrote a book called “What Really Matters,” about the search for meaning in life. After working with Trump, Schwartz writes, he felt a “gnawing emptiness” and became a “seeker,” longing to “be connected to something timeless and essential, more real.”Schwartz told me that he has decided to pledge all royalties from sales of “The Art of the Deal” in 2016 to pointedly chosen charities: the National Immigration Law Center, Human Rights Watch, the Center for the Victims of Torture, the National Immigration Forum, and the Tahirih Justice Center. “I’ll carry this until the end of my life,” he said. But I like the idea that, the more copies that ‘The Art of the Deal’ sells, the more money I can donate to the people whose rights Trump seeks to abridge.”Schwartz expected Trump to attack him for speaking out, and he was correct. I helped him when he didn’t have two cents in his pocket. I guess he thinks it’s good for him—but he’ll find out it’s not good for him.”Minutes after Trump got off the phone with me, Schwartz’s cell phone rang. “I just talked to —which, by the way, is a failing magazine that no one reads—and I heard you were critical of me.”“You’re running for President,” Schwartz said. Informed that Schwartz had made critical remarks about him, and wouldn’t be voting for him, Trump said, “He’s probably just doing it for the publicity.” He also said, “Wow. “I disagree with a lot of what you’re saying.”“That’s your right, but then you should have just remained silent. I just want to tell you that I think you’re very disloyal. I had a lot of choice of who to have write the book, and I chose you, and I was very generous with you. I know that you gave a lot of speeches and lectures using ‘The Art of the Deal.’ I could have sued you, but I didn’t.”“My business has nothing to do with ‘The Art of the Deal.’ ”“That’s not what I’ve been told.”“You’re running for President of the United States. The stakes here are high.”“Yeah, they are,” he said. Schwartz can understand why Trump feels stung, but he felt that he had to speak up before it was too late. As for Trump’s anger toward him, he said, “I don’t take it personally, because the truth is he didn’t mean it personally. Nov 16, 2017. Choose Kevin Anderson & Associates because you deserve the very best ghostwriting service in the industry. Our firm gives you the rare opportunity to work with a team of New York Times bestselling authors, editors, and publishing insiders who will guide you through every step of the ghostwriting process.

Best Ghostwriting Services To Buy Online Fiverr A ghostwriter, I’m about to air your dirty laundry for all to see. The thing is, ghostwriting has become one of those “popular careers” that lacks a firm standard of ethics and often draws out people who just want an easy fix for their professional woes. I’ve run into many a ghostwriter whose ambition far outstrips her talent, so people searching for ghostwriters need to know how to protect themselves. The following eleven statements are true of every ghostwriter, but you need to be on the lookout. And if you are considering a career in ghostwriting, these are the things you’ll want to avoid. Most ghostwriters—even those with immense talent and potential—don’t take the time to increase their knowledge of the industry. This is dangerous for all ghostwriting clients, especially since most of you actually want to see your manuscript in print. Just the other day, I stumbled across a ghostwriter’s web site that claimed the writer had “extensive contacts” with literary agents and New York publishers. The first red flag was the have friends in high places, this fact doesn’t help the client. No self-respecting agent or editor is going to trust a ghostwriter who pimps out every one of his or her clients. A ghostwriter you can trust is one who is honest about his qualifications. He’ll admit that he reads up on industry news, follows publishing trends, tracks articles published by editors and agents. But he won’t try to sell his relationships because , and not PR, is the name of the game. When I was working as a ghostwriter, it always bothered me when I came across competitors who claimed “dozens of sales” to publishers and “over 100 books in print”. And by the time the fourth went to print, I was ready to strike out on my own as an author. My ghostwriting career lasted about five years, and during that time four of my clients sold manuscripts I’d written or edited. Statistically, most ghostwritten manuscripts either never make it to print or are self-published. In fact, many of my clients hired me specifically because they wanted to self-publish, and although I’m not a big fan of POD publishing, who was I to judge? The thing is, most ghostwriters choose this career because they can’t get published themselves. If you manage to hire a ghostwriter whose prose is flawless, whose plot development shines, you’re very lucky indeed. There are, of course, exceptions to the rule, but you’re not paying a best-selling novelist to write your manuscript. Instead, you’re hiring a ghost whose writing abilities exceed your own. So if your ghostwriter is claiming multiple sales to publishers, ask for proof. At the beginning of my ghostwriting career, I took every project offered me, sometimes even when the client’s opinions drastically clashed with mine. As I increased my reputation, however, I began choosing my projects more carefully, and the change was dramatic. Your ghostwriter should be honest when expressing feelings about your manuscript idea, especially if the topic is controversial. The problem is, you can’t always tell if the feelings expressed are genuine. I’d tell you to avoid ghostwriters who gush unnecessarily over your idea, but I’ve been known to get overenthusiastic myself if a client proposes a project that really jazzes me. Ask for a telephone conversation so you can judge the ghostwriter’s opinions more easily. Ghostwriters, just like other professionals, need a way to prove that they are capable of handling projects offered by new clients. Consequently, they disclose the nature of the work they’ve performed for you, and might even provide excerpts from your project to new clients. The problem is that some ghostwriters won’t disclose this to you, which is a breach of your rights. By definition, a ghostwriter works in secret, and the fact that he or she wrote your manuscript should never be made public. Using excerpts in a portfolio is acceptable, but only under certain conditions. First, your ghostwriter should obtain a non-disclosure agreement (NDA) from anyone to whom your working relationship is revealed. This means that your ghostwriter’s prospective clients agree not to share privileged information with anyone else. Second, you should be told whenever your manuscript is used in a portfolio. The only exception is if the client has agreed to place the ghostwriter’s name on the finished product, such as in a shared byline. A ghostwriter who breaches confidentiality without your knowledge is not a professional. An increasing number of ghostwriters are contracting their services out to other professionals, sometimes writers who are not as skillful or as experienced. If you think the telephone company is the only one engaged in outsourcing, you’re kidding yourself. This is most common in ghostwriting businesses that label themselves as “firms” or “companies”. A ghostwriter working alone is probably doing all of the writing, but if you go with a larger organization, there’s no telling who actually writes your manuscript. This isn’t a problem if the final product meets your expectations, but what if it doesn’t? You were lured into the contract with samples of one writer’s work, then handed substandard material by another. Chances are, you won’t have any options at that point. To protect yourself in this situation, make sure the actual writer’s name is in the contract, and look for language that specifies who will actually be working on the project. This isn’t a guarantee, but it’s better than nothing. Did you know that the ghostwriter who pens your manuscript might not even speak English as his or her first language? Outsourcing is popular, but a growing number of ghostwriting firms are working with people in India and other countries to save a buck and increase volume. Some writers in foreign nations will work for as little as Рубрики.50 an hour, which means the thousands of dollars you pay for ghostwriting is lining the pockets of an unscrupulous intermediary. Again, your contract should spell out who is ghosting your manuscript. There is no set industry standard for ghostwriting fees; therefore, price quotes widely vary between professionals. I never accepted less than ,000 for a single full-length manuscript as a ghostwriter, but I knew other writers who routinely worked for less than half that figure. If you insist on paying a ghostwriter peanuts for his or her work, the final product will not meet your expectations. This doesn’t mean that you have to overpay, but it does mean that you need to provide adequate compensation to your ghostwriter. The product will be better and your ghostwriter will be happy to take your calls in the future. The flipside to the previous point is the fact that ghostwriters are usually more than willing to work with their clients on price. For example, some ghostwriters will offer a hybrid service; they’ll help you write portions of your manuscript while overseeing your completion of the rest. It is true that you’ll spend big bucks to hire a ghostwriter to write a full-length novel, but you do have options. Ask your ghostwriter about services that will help you save money while still getting the project done. Like anyone else, ghostwriters have their own set of obligations, biases and alliances. This means that the recommendations your ghostwriter offers concerning your manuscript might be in their his best interests, but not in yours. A ghostwriter is not a publisher, editor, literary agent or book marketer, though some might have skills in this area. It is best to compartmentalize the production of your manuscript; solicit one professional for the writing, one for the selling, one for the marketing, and so on. When hiring a ghostwriter, look over that contract carefully. Many ghostwriters do not hire lawyers to draw up their agreements, and instead write them for themselves. This means that it might contain language that is potentially harmful to your project. For example, does the contract specifically state that the copyright to the material is yours upon payment? Does it spell out the payment agreement in a definitive manner? Make sure that the contract is one you can live with. Unfortunately, many ghostwriting clients just sign whatever document they are handed—and regret it later. This one should be common sense, but you’d be surprised how many of my ghostwriting clients have thought, at one time or another, that I was infallible. I’ve received countless angry e-mails from clients complaining about a misspelled word or a forgotten exclamation point, shocked that a could make such simple mistakes. The manuscript you are handed at the end of the project won’t be perfect, and you might even need to hire an editor to clean it up before you start the submission process. It’s no different from any regular writer penning his or her own manuscript. That said, your ghostwriter should be willing to admit his or her mistakes, and correct them where appropriate. Don’t expect perfection, but don’t settle for substandard material. These eleven points are designed to help you search for an appropriate ghostwriter, not to scare you off from the arrangement entirely. The fact is, there are scrupulous, reputable ghostwriters in the market—and then there’s the . When hiring a ghostwriter, engage in a thorough vetting process. Not only should he or she be competent and experienced, but also the right fit for your project. Best ghostwriting freelance services online. Outsource your ghostwriting project and get it quickly done and delivered remotely online.

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Ghostwriter Jenna Glatzer, whose credits include , which she wrote with Ironman competitor Scott Rigsby, asks many questions when she interviews prospective clients. She usually looks for a business or important personal reason for the project. A book can be a great credibility-building and marketing tool to help the author sell products or services, book speaking engagements, or accomplish some other goal. Authors who simply want their name on a bestseller list without understanding all of the factors—including sales, marketing and distribution–that go into landing on those lists, are often disappointed.“When you’re working with a ghostwriter, if your goal is strictly ‘I want to make a lot of money off this book,’ that’s not necessarily an easy thing to do. You’re usually going to pay the ghostwriter the bulk of the advance to write the book,” she says. Groups like the Association of Ghostwriters and the American Society of Journalists and Authors’ Freelance Writers Search are two places to find experienced ghosts. Glatzer suggests looking for writers who have written books in the genre you’re targeting and calling previous collaborators to find out about their experiences working with the writer. with Bill Mc Gowan, recommends interviewing at least three ghostwriters to compare styles and chemistry. Embarking on such a big project is “a little like forming a long-term romantic relationship,” she says. Not that anything inappropriate will go on, but you’ll be working closely with this person over a period of months, she says. That’s tough to do when you can’t stand each other. An experienced ghostwriter will help you define the scope of the project, including the length of the manuscript and the components that will be included in the final manuscript. However, writing a book with a ghostwriter is a collaborative process, Turner says. You can’t just hire the writer and expect them to produce a book—guidance and input need to come from you, she says. So, be prepared to devote the time necessary for your part of the collaboration, which may take several months or more, she says. It’s a good idea to work on an outline first so you both understand the overall direction of the book and how you’ll organize the material. Your ghostwriter will likely want to have regular phone calls with you to get direction and input on the book’s contents. It’s important to define whether the ghost will also conduct additional research or need to provide other services, such as helping with graphics or photography sourcing or creating an index, which are not typically part of a ghostwriter’s responsibilities. While some companies claim they can deliver a finished book for a few thousand dollars or within a month or two, that’s not likely to be anything you’d want representing you or your brand, Bowman says. Good ghosts aren’t cheap: Bowman says the bottom-line number for a thorough book proposal, which is necessary for most writers to sell their books to publishing houses, from an experienced ghostwriter is somewhere around $5,000 to $8,000. When it comes to manuscripts, Glatzer estimates that less experienced ghostwriters fall into the $20,000 to $30,000 range, while intermediate-level ghosts can go as high as $50,000 or more. A-list writers with serious credentials can command upward of $75,000. “A small list of ghostwriters are consistently in the six-figure range,” she says. Be sure to define details such as the length of the book, how many rounds of revisions are included, and the charges that apply if the scope of work changes. 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Ghostwriting Services Award-Winning/Bestselling Writers June, as dusk fell outside Tony Schwartz’s sprawling house, on a leafy back road in Riverdale, New York, he pulled out his laptop and caught up with the day’s big news: Donald J. As Schwartz watched a video of the speech, he began to feel personally implicated. Trump, facing a crowd that had gathered in the lobby of Trump Tower, on Fifth Avenue, laid out his qualifications, saying, “We need a leader that wrote ‘The Art of the Deal.’ ” If that was so, Schwartz thought, then he, not Trump, should be running. Schwartz dashed off a tweet: “Many thanks Donald Trump for suggesting I run for President, based on the fact that I wrote ‘The Art of the Deal.’ ”Schwartz had ghostwritten Trump’s 1987 breakthrough memoir, earning a joint byline on the cover, half of the book’s five-hundred-thousand-dollar advance, and half of the royalties. The book was a phenomenal success, spending forty-eight weeks on the best-seller list, thirteen of them at No. More than a million copies have been bought, generating several million dollars in royalties. The book expanded Trump’s renown far beyond New York City, making him an emblem of the successful tycoon. Edward Kosner, the former editor and publisher of , where Schwartz worked as a writer at the time, says, “Tony created Trump. Frankenstein.”Starting in late 1985, Schwartz spent eighteen months with Trump—camping out in his office, joining him on his helicopter, tagging along at meetings, and spending weekends with him at his Manhattan apartment and his Florida estate. During that period, Schwartz felt, he had got to know him better than almost anyone else outside the Trump family. Until Schwartz posted the tweet, though, he had not spoken publicly about Trump for decades. It had never been his ambition to be a ghostwriter, and he had been glad to move on. But, as he watched a replay of the new candidate holding forth for forty-five minutes, he noticed something strange: over the decades, Trump appeared to have convinced himself that he written the book. Schwartz recalls thinking, “If he could lie about that on Day One—when it was so easily refuted—he is likely to lie about anything.”It seemed improbable that Trump’s campaign would succeed, so Schwartz told himself that he needn’t worry much. But, as Trump denounced Mexican immigrants as “rapists,” near the end of the speech, Schwartz felt anxious. He had spent hundreds of hours observing Trump firsthand, and felt that he had an unusually deep understanding of what he regarded as Trump’s beguiling strengths and disqualifying weaknesses. Many Americans, however, saw Trump as a charmingly brash entrepreneur with an unfailing knack for business—a mythical image that Schwartz had helped create. “It pays to trust your instincts,” Trump says in the book, adding that he was set to make hundreds of millions of dollars after buying a hotel that he hadn’t even walked through. In the subsequent months, as Trump defied predictions by establishing himself as the front-runner for the Republican nomination, Schwartz’s desire to set the record straight grew. He had long since left journalism to launch the Energy Project, a consulting firm that promises to improve employees’ productivity by helping them boost their “physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual” morale. It was a successful company, with clients such as Facebook, and Schwartz’s colleagues urged him to avoid the political fray. It wasn’t because of Trump’s ideology—Schwartz doubted that he had one. The problem was Trump’s personality, which he considered pathologically impulsive and self-centered. Schwartz thought about publishing an article describing his reservations about Trump, but he hesitated, knowing that, since he’d cashed in on the flattering “Art of the Deal,” his credibility and his motives would be seen as suspect. Schwartz decided that if he kept mum and Trump was elected he’d never forgive himself. In June, he agreed to break his silence and give his first candid interview about the Trump he got to know while acting as his Boswell.“I put lipstick on a pig,” he said. “I feel a deep sense of remorse that I contributed to presenting Trump in a way that brought him wider attention and made him more appealing than he is.” He went on, “I genuinely believe that if Trump wins and gets the nuclear codes there is an excellent possibility it will lead to the end of civilization.”If he were writing “The Art of the Deal” today, Schwartz said, it would be a very different book with a very different title. Asked what he would call it, he answered, “The Sociopath.”The idea of Trump writing an autobiography didn’t originate with either Trump or Schwartz. It began with Si Newhouse, the media magnate whose company, Advance Publications, owned Random House at the time, and continues to own Condé Nast, the parent company of this magazine. “It was very definitely, and almost uniquely, Si Newhouse’s idea,” Peter Osnos, who edited the book, recalls. , which Condé Nast also owns, had published a cover story on Trump, and Newhouse noticed that newsstand sales had been unusually strong. Newhouse called Trump about the project, then visited him to discuss it. Random House continued the pursuit with a series of meetings. At one point, Howard Kaminsky, who ran Random House then, wrapped a thick Russian novel in a dummy cover that featured a photograph of Trump looking like a conquering hero; at the top was Trump’s name, in large gold block lettering. Kaminsky recalls that Trump was pleased by the mockup, but had one suggestion: “Please make my name much bigger.” After securing the half-million-dollar advance, Trump signed a contract. Around this time, Schwartz, who was one of the leading young magazine writers of the day, stopped by Trump’s office, in Trump Tower. In 1985, he’d published a piece in called “A Different Kind of Donald Trump Story,” which portrayed him not as a brilliant mogul but as a ham-fisted thug who had unsuccessfully tried to evict rent-controlled and rent-stabilized tenants from a building that he had bought on Central Park South. Trump’s efforts—which included a plan to house homeless people in the building in order to harass the tenants—became what Schwartz described as a “fugue of failure, a farce of fumbling and bumbling.” An accompanying cover portrait depicted Trump as unshaven, unpleasant-looking, and shiny with sweat. Yet, to Schwartz’s amazement, Trump loved the article. He hung the cover on a wall of his office, and sent a fan note to Schwartz, on his gold-embossed personal stationery. “Everybody seems to have read it,” Trump enthused in the note, which Schwartz has kept.“I was shocked,” Schwartz told me. “Trump didn’t fit any model of human being I’d ever met. He was obsessed with publicity, and he didn’t care what you wrote.” He went on, “Trump only takes two positions. Either you’re a scummy loser, liar, whatever, or you’re the greatest. He wanted to be seen as a tough guy, and he loved being on the cover.” Schwartz wrote him back, saying, “Of all the people I’ve written about over the years, you are certainly the best sport.”And so Schwartz had returned for more, this time to conduct an interview for . But to his frustration Trump kept making cryptic, monosyllabic statements. “He mysteriously wouldn’t answer my questions,” Schwartz said. After twenty minutes, he said, Trump explained that he didn’t want to reveal anything new about himself—he had just signed a lucrative book deal and needed to save his best material.“What kind of book? ” Schwartz said.“My autobiography,” Trump replied.“You’re only thirty-eight—you don’t have one yet! He knew that he would be making a Faustian bargain. ” Schwartz joked.“Yeah, I know,” Trump said.“If I were you,” Schwartz recalls telling him, “I’d write a book called ‘The Art of the Deal.’ something people would be interested in.”“You’re right,” Trump agreed. A lifelong liberal, he was hardly an admirer of Trump’s ruthless and single-minded pursuit of profit. “It was one of a number of times in my life when I was divided between the Devil and the higher side,” he told me. He had grown up in a bourgeois, intellectual family in Manhattan, and had attended élite private schools, but he was not as wealthy as some of his classmates—and, unlike many of them, he had no trust fund. “But my parents made it clear: ‘You’re on your own.’ ” Around the time Trump made his offer, Schwartz’s wife, Deborah Pines, became pregnant with their second daughter, and he worried that the family wouldn’t fit into their Manhattan apartment, whose mortgage was already too high. “I thought money would keep me safe and secure—or that was my rationalization.” At the same time, he knew that if he took Trump’s money and adopted Trump’s voice his journalism career would be badly damaged. He told Trump that if he would give him half the advance and half the book’s royalties he’d take the job. His heroes were such literary nonfiction writers as Tom Wolfe, John Mc Phee, and David Halberstam. Such terms are unusually generous for a ghostwriter. Literally, the term was invented to describe what I did.” Soon Schwartz thought that “The Art of the Deal” would be an easy project. Trump, despite having a reputation as a tough negotiator, agreed on the spot. The book’s structure would be simple: he’d chronicle half a dozen or so of Trump’s biggest real-estate deals, dispense some bromides about how to succeed in business, and fill in Trump’s life story. For research, he planned to interview Trump on a series of Saturday mornings. After Trump gave him a tour of his marble-and-gilt apartment atop Trump Tower—which, to Schwartz, looked unlived-in, like the lobby of a hotel—they began to talk. But the discussion was soon hobbled by what Schwartz regards as one of Trump’s most essential characteristics: “He has no attention span.”In those days, Schwartz recalls, Trump was generally affable with reporters, offering short, amusingly immodest quotes on demand. Trump had been forthcoming with him during the needed to provide him with sustained, thoughtful recollections. He asked Trump to describe his childhood in detail. After sitting for only a few minutes in his suit and tie, Trump became impatient and irritable. He looked fidgety, Schwartz recalls, “like a kindergartner who can’t sit still in a classroom.” Even when Schwartz pressed him, Trump seemed to remember almost nothing of his youth, and made it clear that he was bored. Far more quickly than Schwartz had expected, Trump ended the meeting. Schwartz tried to limit the sessions to smaller increments of time, but Trump’s contributions remained oddly truncated and superficial.“Trump has been written about a thousand ways from Sunday, but this fundamental aspect of who he is doesn’t seem to be fully understood,” Schwartz told me. “It’s implicit in a lot of what people write, but it’s never explicit—or, at least, I haven’t seen it. ” Schwartz trailed off, shaking his head in amazement. And that is that it’s impossible to keep him focussed on any topic, other than his own self-aggrandizement, for more than a few minutes, and even then . He regards Trump’s inability to concentrate as alarming in a Presidential candidate. That’s what I do.”But Schwartz believes that Trump’s short attention span has left him with “a stunning level of superficial knowledge and plain ignorance.” He said, “That’s why he so prefers TV as his first news source—information comes in easily digestible sound bites.” He added, “I seriously doubt that Trump has ever read a book straight through in his adult life.” During the eighteen months that he observed Trump, Schwartz said, he never saw a book on Trump’s desk, or elsewhere in his office, or in his apartment. “If he had to be briefed on a crisis in the Situation Room, it’s impossible to imagine him paying attention over a long period of time,” he said. Other journalists have noticed Trump’s apparent lack of interest in reading. In a recent phone interview, Trump told me that, to the contrary, he has the skill that matters most in a crisis: the ability to forge compromises. In May, Megyn Kelly, of Fox News, asked him to name his favorite book, other than the Bible or “The Art of the Deal.” Trump picked the 1929 novel “All Quiet on the Western Front.” Evidently suspecting that many years had elapsed since he’d read it, Kelly asked Trump to talk about the most recent book he’d read. The reason he touted “The Art of the Deal” in his announcement, he explained, was that he believes that recent Presidents have lacked his toughness and finesse: “Look at the trade deficit with China. “I read passages, I read areas, I’ll read chapters—I don’t have the time,” Trump said. As noted recently, this attitude is not shared by most U. Presidents, including Barack Obama, a habitual consumer of current books, and George W. Bush, who reportedly engaged in a fiercely competitive book-reading contest with his political adviser Karl Rove. Trump’s first wife, Ivana, famously claimed that Trump kept a copy of Adolf Hitler’s collected speeches, “My New Order,” in a cabinet beside his bed. “I thought he would find it interesting,” Davis told her. “Growing desperate, Schwartz devised a strategy for trapping Trump into giving more material. He made plans to spend the weekend with Trump at Mar-a-Lago, his mansion in Palm Beach, where there would be fewer distractions. As they chatted in the garden, Ivana icily walked by, clearly annoyed that Schwartz was competing for her husband’s limited free time. Long before lunch on Saturday, Schwartz recalls, Trump “essentially threw a fit.” He stood up and announced that he couldn’t stand any more questions. Schwartz went to his room, called his literary agent, Kathy Robbins, and told her that he couldn’t do the book. (Robbins confirms this.) As Schwartz headed back to New York, though, he came up with another plan. He would propose eavesdropping on Trump’s life by following him around on the job and, more important, by listening in on his office phone calls. That way, extracting extended reflections from Trump would not be required. When Schwartz presented the idea to Trump, he loved it. Almost every day from then on, Schwartz sat about eight feet away from him in the Trump Tower office, listening on an extension of Trump’s phone line. Schwartz says that none of the bankers, lawyers, brokers, and reporters who called Trump realized that they were being monitored. The calls usually didn’t last long, and Trump’s assistant facilitated the conversation-hopping. While he was talking with someone, she often came in with a Post-it note informing him of the next caller on hold.“He was playing people,” Schwartz recalls. On the phone with business associates, Trump would flatter, bully, and occasionally get mad, but always in a calculated way. Before the discussion ended, Trump would “share the news of his latest success,” Schwartz says. Instead of saying goodbye at the end of a call, Trump customarily signed off with “You’re the greatest! ” There was not a single call that Trump deemed too private for Schwartz to hear. “If he could have had three hundred thousand people listening in, he would have been even happier.”This year, Schwartz has heard some argue that there must be a more thoughtful and nuanced version of Donald Trump that he is keeping in reserve for after the campaign. “There is no private Trump.” This is not a matter of hindsight. While working on “The Art of the Deal,” Schwartz kept a journal in which he expressed his amazement at Trump’s personality, writing that Trump seemed driven entirely by a need for public attention. “All he is is ‘stomp, stomp, stomp’—recognition from outside, bigger, more, a whole series of things that go nowhere in particular,” he observed, on October 21, 1986. But, as he noted in the journal a few days later, “the book will be far more successful if Trump is a sympathetic character—even weirdly sympathetic—than if he is just hateful or, worse yet, a one-dimensional blowhard.”Eavesdropping solved the interview problem, but it presented a new one. After hearing Trump’s discussions about business on the phone, Schwartz asked him brief follow-up questions. He then tried to amplify the material he got from Trump by calling others involved in the deals. But their accounts often directly conflicted with Trump’s. “More than anyone else I have ever met, Trump has the ability to convince himself that whatever he is saying at any given moment is true, or sort of true, or at least to be true.” Often, Schwartz said, the lies that Trump told him were about money—“how much he had paid for something, or what a building he owned was worth, or how much one of his casinos was earning when it was actually on its way to bankruptcy.” Trump bragged that he paid only eight million dollars for Mar-a-Lago, but omitted that he bought a nearby strip of beach for a record sum. After gossip columns reported, erroneously, that Prince Charles was considering buying several apartments in Trump Tower, Trump implied that he had no idea where the rumor had started. (“It certainly didn’t hurt us,” he says, in “The Art of the Deal.”) Wayne Barrett, a reporter for the , later revealed that Trump himself had planted the story with journalists. Schwartz also suspected that Trump engaged in such media tricks, and asked him about a story making the rounds—that Trump often called up news outlets using a pseudonym. As Schwartz recalls, he smirked and said, “You like that, do you? He had a complete lack of conscience about it.” Since most people are “constrained by the truth,” Trump’s indifference to it “gave him a strange advantage.”When challenged about the facts, Schwartz says, Trump would often double down, repeat himself, and grow belligerent. This quality was recently on display after Trump posted on Twitter a derogatory image of Hillary Clinton that contained a six-pointed star lifted from a white-supremacist Web site. Campaign staffers took the image down, but two days later Trump angrily defended it, insisting that there was no anti-Semitic implication. People want to believe that something is the biggest and the greatest and the most spectacular. It’s an innocent form of exaggeration—and it’s a very effective form of promotion.” Schwartz now disavows the passage. In his journal, Schwartz describes the process of trying to make Trump’s voice palatable in the book. Whenever “the thin veneer of Trump’s vanity is challenged,” Schwartz says, he overreacts—not an ideal quality in a head of state. “Deceit,” he told me, is never “innocent.” He added, “ ‘Truthful hyperbole’ is a contradiction in terms. It was kind of “a trick,” he writes, to mimic Trump’s blunt, staccato, no-apologies delivery while making him seem almost boyishly appealing. Other people paint beautifully on canvas or write wonderful poetry. That’s how I get my kicks.” Schwartz now laughs at this depiction of Trump as a devoted artisan. “One of the most deep and basic needs he has is to prove that ‘I’m richer than you.’ ” As for the idea that making deals is a form of poetry, Schwartz says, “He was incapable of saying something like that—it wouldn’t even be in his vocabulary.” He saw Trump as driven not by a pure love of dealmaking but by an insatiable hunger for “money, praise, and celebrity.” Often, after spending the day with Trump, and watching him pile one hugely expensive project atop the next, like a circus performer spinning plates, Schwartz would go home and tell his wife, “He’s a living black hole! When Schwartz began writing “The Art of the Deal,” he realized that he needed to put an acceptable face on Trump’s loose relationship with the truth. Writing in Trump’s voice, he explained to the reader, “I play to people’s fantasies. One strategy was to make it appear that Trump was just having fun at the office. ”Schwartz reminded himself that he was being paid to tell Trump’s story, not his own, but the more he worked on the project the more disturbing he found it. “I try not to take any of what’s happened too seriously,” Trump says in the book. In his journal, he describes the hours he spent with Trump as “draining” and “deadening.” Schwartz told me that Trump’s need for attention is “completely compulsive,” and that his bid for the Presidency is part of a continuum. “The real excitement is playing the game.”In his journal, Schwartz wrote, “Trump stands for many of the things I abhor: his willingness to run over people, the gaudy, tacky, gigantic obsessions, the absolute lack of interest in anything beyond power and money.” Looking back at the text now, Schwartz says, “I created a character far more winning than Trump actually is.” The first line of the book is an example. “He’s managed to keep increasing the dose for forty years,” Schwartz said. After he’d spent decades as a tabloid titan, “the only thing left was running for President. If he could run for emperor of the world, he would.”Rhetorically, Schwartz’s aim in “The Art of the Deal” was to present Trump as the hero of every chapter, but, after looking into some of his supposedly brilliant deals, Schwartz concluded that there were cases in which there was no way to make Trump look good. So he sidestepped unflattering incidents and details. “I didn’t consider it my job to investigate,” he says. Schwartz also tried to avoid the strong whiff of cronyism that hovered over some deals. In his 1986 journal, he describes what a challenge it was to “put his best foot forward” in writing about one of Trump’s first triumphs: his development, starting in 1975, of the Grand Hyatt Hotel, on the site of the former Commodore Hotel, next to Grand Central Terminal. In order to afford the hotel, Trump required an extremely large tax abatement. Richard Ravitch, who was then in charge of the agency that had the authority to grant such tax breaks to developers, recalls that he declined to grant the abatement, and Trump got “so unpleasant I had to tell him to get out.” Trump got it anyway, largely because key city officials had received years of donations from his father, Fred Trump, who was a major real-estate developer in Queens. Wayne Barrett, whose reporting for the informed his definitive 1991 book, “Trump: The Deals and the Downfall,” says, “It was all Fred’s political connections that created the abatement.” In addition, Trump snookered rivals into believing that he had an exclusive option from the city on the project, when he didn’t. Trump also deceived his partner in the deal, Jay Pritzker, the head of the Hyatt Hotel chain. Pritzker had rejected an unfavorable term proposed by Trump, but at the closing Trump forced it through, knowing that Pritzker was on a mountain in Nepal and could not be reached. Schwartz wrote in his journal that “almost everything” about the hotel deal had “an immoral cast.” But as the ghostwriter he was “trying hard to find my way around” behavior that he considered “if not reprehensible, at least morally questionable.”Many tall tales that Trump told Schwartz contained a kernel of truth but made him out to be cleverer than he was. One of Trump’s favorite stories was about how he had tricked the company that owned Holiday Inn into becoming his partner in an Atlantic City casino. Trump claimed that he had quieted executives’ fears of construction delays by ordering his construction supervisor to make a vacant lot that he owned look like “the most active construction site in the history of the world.” As Trump tells it in “The Art of the Deal,” there were so many dump trucks and bulldozers pushing around dirt and filling holes that had just been dug that when Holiday Inn executives visited the site it “looked as if we were in the midst of building the Grand Coulee Dam.” The stunt, Trump claimed, pushed the deal through. After the book came out, though, a consultant for Trump’s casinos, Al Glasgow, who is now deceased, told Schwartz, “It never happened.” There may have been one or two trucks, but not the fleet that made it a great story. Schwartz tamped down some of Trump’s swagger, but plenty of it remained. The manuscript that Random House published was, depending on your perspective, either entertainingly insightful or shamelessly self-aggrandizing. To borrow a title from Norman Mailer, who frequently attended prizefights at Trump’s Atlantic City hotels, the book could have been called “Advertisements for Myself.”In 2005, Timothy L. O’Brien, an award-winning journalist who is currently the executive editor of Bloomberg View, published “Trump Nation,” a meticulous investigative biography. (Trump unsuccessfully sued him for libel.) O’Brien has taken a close look at “The Art of the Deal,” and he told me that it might be best characterized as a “nonfiction work of fiction.” Trump’s life story, as told by Schwartz, honestly chronicled a few setbacks, such as Trump’s disastrous 1983 purchase of the New Jersey Generals, a football team in the flailing United States Football League. But O’Brien believes that Trump used the book to turn almost every step of his life, both personal and professional, into a “glittering fable.”Some of the falsehoods in “The Art of the Deal” are minor. upended Trump’s claims that Ivana had been a “top model” and an alternate on the Czech Olympic ski team. Barrett notes that in “The Art of the Deal” Trump describes his father as having been born in New Jersey to Swedish parents; in fact, he was born in the Bronx to German parents. (Decades later, Trump spread falsehoods about Obama’s origins, claiming it was possible that the President was born in Africa.)In “The Art of the Deal,” Trump portrays himself as a warm family man with endless admirers. He praises Ivana’s taste and business skill—“I said you can’t bet against Ivana, and she proved me right.” But Schwartz noticed little warmth or communication between Trump and Ivana, and he later learned that while “The Art of the Deal” was being written Trump began an affair with Marla Maples, who became his second wife. (He divorced Ivana in 1992.) As far as Schwartz could tell, Trump spent very little time with his family and had no close friends. literally standing by you to the death.” Cohn, who in the fifties assisted Senator Joseph Mc Carthy in his vicious crusade against Communism, was closeted. In “The Art of the Deal,” Trump describes Roy Cohn, his personal lawyer, in the warmest terms, calling him “the sort of guy who’d be there at your hospital bed . He felt abandoned by Trump when he became fatally ill from , and said, “Donald pisses ice water.” Schwartz says of Trump, “He’d like people when they were helpful, and turn on them when they weren’t. He’s a transactional man—it was all about what you could do for him.”According to Barrett, among the most misleading aspects of “The Art of the Deal” was the idea that Trump made it largely on his own, with only minimal help from his father, Fred. Barrett, in his book, notes that Trump once declared, “The working man likes me because he knows I didn’t inherit what I’ve built,” and that in “The Art of the Deal” he derides wealthy heirs as members of “the Lucky Sperm Club.”Trump’s self-portrayal as a Horatio Alger figure has buttressed his populist appeal in 2016. Fred’s fortune, based on his ownership of middle-income properties, wasn’t glamorous, but it was sizable: in 2003, a few years after Fred died, Trump and his siblings reportedly sold some of their father’s real-estate holdings for half a billion dollars. In “The Art of the Deal,” Trump cites his father as “the most important influence on me,” but in his telling his father’s main legacy was teaching him the importance of “toughness.” Beyond that, Schwartz says, Trump “barely talked about his father—he didn’t want his success to be seen as having anything to do with him.” But when Barrett investigated he found that Trump’s father was instrumental in his son’s rise, financially and politically. In the book, Trump says that “my energy and my enthusiasm” explain how, as a twenty-nine-year-old with few accomplishments, he acquired the Grand Hyatt Hotel. Barrett reports, however, that Trump’s father had to co-sign the many contracts that the deal required. He also lent Trump seven and a half million dollars to get started as a casino owner in Atlantic City; at one point, when Trump couldn’t meet payments on other loans, his father tried to tide him over by sending a lawyer to buy some three million dollars’ worth of gambling chips. Barrett told me, “Donald did make some smart moves himself, particularly in assembling the site for the Trump Tower. That was a stroke of genius.” Nonetheless, he said, “The notion that he’s a self-made man is a joke. But I guess they couldn’t call the book ‘The Art of My Father’s Deals.’ ”The other key myth perpetuated by “The Art of the Deal” was that Trump’s intuitions about business were almost flawless. “The book helped fuel the notion that he couldn’t fail,” Barrett said. But, unbeknown to Schwartz and the public, by late 1987, when the book came out, Trump was heading toward what Barrett calls “simultaneous personal and professional self-destruction.” O’Brien agrees that during the next several years Trump’s life unravelled. The divorce from Ivana reportedly cost him twenty-five million dollars. Meanwhile, he was in the midst of what O’Brien calls “a crazy shopping spree that resulted in unmanageable debt.” He was buying the Plaza Hotel and also planning to erect “the tallest building in the world,” on the former rail yards that he had bought on the West Side. In 1987, the city denied him permission to construct such a tall skyscraper, but in “The Art of the Deal” he brushed off this failure with a one-liner: “I can afford to wait.” O’Brien says, “The reality is that he afford to wait. He was telling the media that the carrying costs were three million dollars, when in fact they were more like twenty million.” Trump was also building a third casino in Atlantic City, the Taj, which he promised would be “the biggest casino in history.” He bought the Eastern Air Lines shuttle that operated out of New York, Boston, and Washington, rechristening it the Trump Shuttle, and acquired a giant yacht, the Trump Princess. “He was on a total run of complete and utter self-absorption,” Barrett says, adding, “It’s kind of like now.”Schwartz said that when he was writing the book “the greatest percentage of Trump’s assets was in casinos, and he made it sound like each casino was more successful than the last. But every one of them was failing.” He went on, “I think he was just spinning. I don’t think he could have believed it at the time. He had to have been terrified.”In 1992, the journalist David Cay Johnston published a book about casinos, “Temples of Chance,” and cited a net-worth statement from 1990 that assessed Trump’s personal wealth. It showed that Trump owed nearly three hundred million dollars more to his creditors than his assets were worth. The next year, his company was forced into bankruptcy—the first of six such instances. But in “The Art of the Deal,” O’Brien told me, “Trump shrewdly and unabashedly promoted an image of himself as a dealmaker nonpareil who could always get the best out of every situation—and who can now deliver America from its malaise.” This idealized version was presented to an exponentially larger audience, O’Brien noted, when Mark Burnett, the reality-television producer, read “The Art of the Deal” and decided to base a new show on it, “The Apprentice,” with Trump as the star. The first season of the show, which premièred in 2004, opens with Trump in the back of a limousine, boasting, “I’ve mastered the art of the deal, and I’ve turned the name Trump into the highest-quality brand.” An image of the book’s cover flashes onscreen as Trump explains that, as the “master,” he is now seeking an apprentice. O’Brien said, “ ‘The Apprentice’ is mythmaking on steroids. There’s a straight line from the book to the show to the 2016 campaign.”It took Schwartz a little more than a year to write “The Art of the Deal.” In the spring of 1987, he sent the manuscript to Trump, who returned it to him shortly afterward. 1 best-seller, and one of the best-selling business books of all time. There were a few red marks made with a fat-tipped Magic Marker, most of which deleted criticisms that Trump had made of powerful individuals he no longer wanted to offend, such as Lee Iacocca. Some say it was the best-selling business book ever.” (It is not.) Howard Kaminsky, the former Random House head, laughed and said, “Trump didn’t write a postcard for us! Otherwise, Schwartz says, Trump changed almost nothing. ”Trump was far more involved in the book’s promotion. In my phone interview with Trump, he initially said of Schwartz, “Tony was very good. He wooed booksellers and made one television appearance after another. He was the co-author.” But he dismissed Schwartz’s account of the writing process. He publicly promised to donate his cut of the book’s royalties to charity. He even made a surprise trip to New Hampshire, where he stirred additional publicity by floating the possibility that he might run for President. In December of 1987, a month after the book was published, Trump hosted an extravagant book party in the pink marble atrium of Trump Tower. Klieg lights lit a red carpet outside the building. Inside, nearly a thousand guests, in black tie, were served champagne and fed slices of a giant cake replica of Trump Tower, which was wheeled in by a parade of women waving red sparklers. The boxing promoter Don King greeted the crowd in a floor-length mink coat, and the comedian Jackie Mason introduced Donald and Ivana with the words “Here comes the king and queen! ” Trump toasted Schwartz, saying teasingly that he had at least tried to teach him how to make money. Schwartz got more of an education the next day, when he and Trump spoke on the phone. After chatting briefly about the party, Trump informed Schwartz that, as his ghostwriter, he owed him for half the event’s cost, which was in the six figures. “He wanted me to split the cost of entertaining his list of nine hundred second-rate celebrities? ” Schwartz had, in fact, learned a few things from watching Trump. He drastically negotiated down the amount that he agreed to pay, to a few thousand dollars, and then wrote Trump a letter promising to write a check not to Trump but to a charity of Schwartz’s choosing. In the past seven years, Trump has promised to give millions of dollars to charity, but reporters for the Washington Not long after the discussion of the party bills, Trump approached Schwartz about writing a sequel, for which Trump had been offered a seven-figure advance. This time, however, he offered Schwartz only a third of the profits. He pointed out that, because the advance was much bigger, the payout would be, too. Feeling deeply alienated, he instead wrote a book called “What Really Matters,” about the search for meaning in life. After working with Trump, Schwartz writes, he felt a “gnawing emptiness” and became a “seeker,” longing to “be connected to something timeless and essential, more real.”Schwartz told me that he has decided to pledge all royalties from sales of “The Art of the Deal” in 2016 to pointedly chosen charities: the National Immigration Law Center, Human Rights Watch, the Center for the Victims of Torture, the National Immigration Forum, and the Tahirih Justice Center. “I’ll carry this until the end of my life,” he said. But I like the idea that, the more copies that ‘The Art of the Deal’ sells, the more money I can donate to the people whose rights Trump seeks to abridge.”Schwartz expected Trump to attack him for speaking out, and he was correct. I helped him when he didn’t have two cents in his pocket. I guess he thinks it’s good for him—but he’ll find out it’s not good for him.”Minutes after Trump got off the phone with me, Schwartz’s cell phone rang. “I just talked to —which, by the way, is a failing magazine that no one reads—and I heard you were critical of me.”“You’re running for President,” Schwartz said. Informed that Schwartz had made critical remarks about him, and wouldn’t be voting for him, Trump said, “He’s probably just doing it for the publicity.” He also said, “Wow. “I disagree with a lot of what you’re saying.”“That’s your right, but then you should have just remained silent. I just want to tell you that I think you’re very disloyal. I had a lot of choice of who to have write the book, and I chose you, and I was very generous with you. I know that you gave a lot of speeches and lectures using ‘The Art of the Deal.’ I could have sued you, but I didn’t.”“My business has nothing to do with ‘The Art of the Deal.’ ”“That’s not what I’ve been told.”“You’re running for President of the United States. The stakes here are high.”“Yeah, they are,” he said. Schwartz can understand why Trump feels stung, but he felt that he had to speak up before it was too late. As for Trump’s anger toward him, he said, “I don’t take it personally, because the truth is he didn’t mean it personally. Nov 16, 2017. Choose Kevin Anderson & Associates because you deserve the very best ghostwriting service in the industry. Our firm gives you the rare opportunity to work with a team of New York Times bestselling authors, editors, and publishing insiders who will guide you through every step of the ghostwriting process.

Best Ghostwriting Services To Buy Online Fiverr A ghostwriter, I’m about to air your dirty laundry for all to see. The thing is, ghostwriting has become one of those “popular careers” that lacks a firm standard of ethics and often draws out people who just want an easy fix for their professional woes. I’ve run into many a ghostwriter whose ambition far outstrips her talent, so people searching for ghostwriters need to know how to protect themselves. The following eleven statements are true of every ghostwriter, but you need to be on the lookout. And if you are considering a career in ghostwriting, these are the things you’ll want to avoid. Most ghostwriters—even those with immense talent and potential—don’t take the time to increase their knowledge of the industry. This is dangerous for all ghostwriting clients, especially since most of you actually want to see your manuscript in print. Just the other day, I stumbled across a ghostwriter’s web site that claimed the writer had “extensive contacts” with literary agents and New York publishers. The first red flag was the have friends in high places, this fact doesn’t help the client. No self-respecting agent or editor is going to trust a ghostwriter who pimps out every one of his or her clients. A ghostwriter you can trust is one who is honest about his qualifications. He’ll admit that he reads up on industry news, follows publishing trends, tracks articles published by editors and agents. But he won’t try to sell his relationships because , and not PR, is the name of the game. When I was working as a ghostwriter, it always bothered me when I came across competitors who claimed “dozens of sales” to publishers and “over 100 books in print”. And by the time the fourth went to print, I was ready to strike out on my own as an author. My ghostwriting career lasted about five years, and during that time four of my clients sold manuscripts I’d written or edited. Statistically, most ghostwritten manuscripts either never make it to print or are self-published. In fact, many of my clients hired me specifically because they wanted to self-publish, and although I’m not a big fan of POD publishing, who was I to judge? The thing is, most ghostwriters choose this career because they can’t get published themselves. If you manage to hire a ghostwriter whose prose is flawless, whose plot development shines, you’re very lucky indeed. There are, of course, exceptions to the rule, but you’re not paying a best-selling novelist to write your manuscript. Instead, you’re hiring a ghost whose writing abilities exceed your own. So if your ghostwriter is claiming multiple sales to publishers, ask for proof. At the beginning of my ghostwriting career, I took every project offered me, sometimes even when the client’s opinions drastically clashed with mine. As I increased my reputation, however, I began choosing my projects more carefully, and the change was dramatic. Your ghostwriter should be honest when expressing feelings about your manuscript idea, especially if the topic is controversial. The problem is, you can’t always tell if the feelings expressed are genuine. I’d tell you to avoid ghostwriters who gush unnecessarily over your idea, but I’ve been known to get overenthusiastic myself if a client proposes a project that really jazzes me. Ask for a telephone conversation so you can judge the ghostwriter’s opinions more easily. Ghostwriters, just like other professionals, need a way to prove that they are capable of handling projects offered by new clients. Consequently, they disclose the nature of the work they’ve performed for you, and might even provide excerpts from your project to new clients. The problem is that some ghostwriters won’t disclose this to you, which is a breach of your rights. By definition, a ghostwriter works in secret, and the fact that he or she wrote your manuscript should never be made public. Using excerpts in a portfolio is acceptable, but only under certain conditions. First, your ghostwriter should obtain a non-disclosure agreement (NDA) from anyone to whom your working relationship is revealed. This means that your ghostwriter’s prospective clients agree not to share privileged information with anyone else. Second, you should be told whenever your manuscript is used in a portfolio. The only exception is if the client has agreed to place the ghostwriter’s name on the finished product, such as in a shared byline. A ghostwriter who breaches confidentiality without your knowledge is not a professional. An increasing number of ghostwriters are contracting their services out to other professionals, sometimes writers who are not as skillful or as experienced. If you think the telephone company is the only one engaged in outsourcing, you’re kidding yourself. This is most common in ghostwriting businesses that label themselves as “firms” or “companies”. A ghostwriter working alone is probably doing all of the writing, but if you go with a larger organization, there’s no telling who actually writes your manuscript. This isn’t a problem if the final product meets your expectations, but what if it doesn’t? You were lured into the contract with samples of one writer’s work, then handed substandard material by another. Chances are, you won’t have any options at that point. To protect yourself in this situation, make sure the actual writer’s name is in the contract, and look for language that specifies who will actually be working on the project. This isn’t a guarantee, but it’s better than nothing. Did you know that the ghostwriter who pens your manuscript might not even speak English as his or her first language? Outsourcing is popular, but a growing number of ghostwriting firms are working with people in India and other countries to save a buck and increase volume. Some writers in foreign nations will work for as little as $0.50 an hour, which means the thousands of dollars you pay for ghostwriting is lining the pockets of an unscrupulous intermediary. Again, your contract should spell out who is ghosting your manuscript. There is no set industry standard for ghostwriting fees; therefore, price quotes widely vary between professionals. I never accepted less than $10,000 for a single full-length manuscript as a ghostwriter, but I knew other writers who routinely worked for less than half that figure. If you insist on paying a ghostwriter peanuts for his or her work, the final product will not meet your expectations. This doesn’t mean that you have to overpay, but it does mean that you need to provide adequate compensation to your ghostwriter. The product will be better and your ghostwriter will be happy to take your calls in the future. The flipside to the previous point is the fact that ghostwriters are usually more than willing to work with their clients on price. For example, some ghostwriters will offer a hybrid service; they’ll help you write portions of your manuscript while overseeing your completion of the rest. It is true that you’ll spend big bucks to hire a ghostwriter to write a full-length novel, but you do have options. Ask your ghostwriter about services that will help you save money while still getting the project done. Like anyone else, ghostwriters have their own set of obligations, biases and alliances. This means that the recommendations your ghostwriter offers concerning your manuscript might be in their his best interests, but not in yours. A ghostwriter is not a publisher, editor, literary agent or book marketer, though some might have skills in this area. It is best to compartmentalize the production of your manuscript; solicit one professional for the writing, one for the selling, one for the marketing, and so on. When hiring a ghostwriter, look over that contract carefully. Many ghostwriters do not hire lawyers to draw up their agreements, and instead write them for themselves. This means that it might contain language that is potentially harmful to your project. For example, does the contract specifically state that the copyright to the material is yours upon payment? Does it spell out the payment agreement in a definitive manner? Make sure that the contract is one you can live with. Unfortunately, many ghostwriting clients just sign whatever document they are handed—and regret it later. This one should be common sense, but you’d be surprised how many of my ghostwriting clients have thought, at one time or another, that I was infallible. I’ve received countless angry e-mails from clients complaining about a misspelled word or a forgotten exclamation point, shocked that a could make such simple mistakes. The manuscript you are handed at the end of the project won’t be perfect, and you might even need to hire an editor to clean it up before you start the submission process. It’s no different from any regular writer penning his or her own manuscript. That said, your ghostwriter should be willing to admit his or her mistakes, and correct them where appropriate. Don’t expect perfection, but don’t settle for substandard material. These eleven points are designed to help you search for an appropriate ghostwriter, not to scare you off from the arrangement entirely. The fact is, there are scrupulous, reputable ghostwriters in the market—and then there’s the . When hiring a ghostwriter, engage in a thorough vetting process. Not only should he or she be competent and experienced, but also the right fit for your project. Best ghostwriting freelance services online. Outsource your ghostwriting project and get it quickly done and delivered remotely online.

Best Ghostwriters For Hire In March 2018 - Upwork™ Writer4me employs a creative team of qualified and bestseller writers, ghost writers, awarded developers and nation’s best legal experts. All your writing, web development, SEO, legal, virtual assistant and designing solutions under one roof. World’s most popular ghost writer service (source: Alexa.com) Genuinely cost-effective solutions. Experience of working with BBC & National Geographic. Secured site, for online payments (secured by COMODO). Large number of satisfied customers across 49 nations. For large ghostwriting, fiction and screenplay projects worth over $1,000 sign contract and ask for installment payment facility. Hire experienced ghost writers today. Post your ghost writing projects for free and connect with professional writers from around the world.

Things Your Ghostwriter Doesn't Want You to Know Sam Tamlyn Little ghost in sheet with pencil pointing to right. Cole is on the Internet since 2003 doing book ghostwriting and book ghost writing for those who understand that either affordable or bestselling freelance writing works. also works on scripts, screenplays, video work, film and TV, music and lyrics. " data-medium-file="https://i0com/ghostwriterbook.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Ghost-Writer-Inc-logo.jpg? fit=240,240&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0com/ghostwriterbook.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Ghost-Writer-Inc-logo.jpg? " data-medium-file="https://i1com/ghostwriterbook.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/ghostwriter-with-caption-e1454637810376.jpg? fit=178,209&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i1com/ghostwriterbook.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/ghostwriter-with-caption-e1454637810376.jpg? fit=178,209&ssl=1" src="https://i1com/ghostwriterbook.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/ghostwriter-with-caption-e1454637810376.jpg? w=186&h=218&crop&ssl=1" width="186" height="218" data-original-width="186" data-original-height="218" itemprop=" title="Book Ghostwriter" alt="book ghostwriter on google" style="width: 186px; height: 218px;" /New York Times bestseller ghostwriter – also Amazon bestselling ghostwriter and editor Karen S. Cole – text or call me, I’m here weekdays mostly: 425.205.9707 or [email protected], PROFESSIONAL BOOK GHOST WRITING. This matters to you as a newbie manuscript writer or published book author. I am a I’m well-known within certain publishing circles. I work with select newbie clients for only $5,000 to $25,000 USD. It’s on up to $50,000 USD (for other celebrity-oriented members of our team) per 50-400 page manuscript. We work for far less for editing, book doctoring, coaching, and developmental rewriting projects. If you're thinking about hiring a ghostwriter, it's best you get the skinny straight from the horse's mouth. Unfortunately, if you are a ghostwriter. An increasing number of ghostwriters are contracting their services out to other professionals, sometimes writers who are not as skillful or as experienced. If you think the telephone.

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Ghostwriting Services GHOST WRITER, INC. Karen S. Cole Or, you don’t even have time to write a blog post, let alone a whole book. These scribes-for-hire work with you to turn your ideas into manuscript form, either for a publishing house or as a work you can self-publish.“Ghostwriting as a field has been growing dramatically because people are hearing about this person, a ghostwriter, who can work magic and create a book out of nothing. I think sometimes people have the wrong impression of what a ghostwriter does,” says Marcia Layton Turner, ghostwriter and founder of the Association of Ghostwriters, a membership organization for ghostwriters and other book collaborators. So, before you shell out big bucks to have someone pen the Great American Business Book, take some advice from the ghostwriters themselves to make sure the venture is a success. Ghostwriter Jenna Glatzer, whose credits include , which she wrote with Ironman competitor Scott Rigsby, asks many questions when she interviews prospective clients. She usually looks for a business or important personal reason for the project. A book can be a great credibility-building and marketing tool to help the author sell products or services, book speaking engagements, or accomplish some other goal. Authors who simply want their name on a bestseller list without understanding all of the factors—including sales, marketing and distribution–that go into landing on those lists, are often disappointed.“When you’re working with a ghostwriter, if your goal is strictly ‘I want to make a lot of money off this book,’ that’s not necessarily an easy thing to do. You’re usually going to pay the ghostwriter the bulk of the advance to write the book,” she says. Groups like the Association of Ghostwriters and the American Society of Journalists and Authors’ Freelance Writers Search are two places to find experienced ghosts. Glatzer suggests looking for writers who have written books in the genre you’re targeting and calling previous collaborators to find out about their experiences working with the writer. with Bill Mc Gowan, recommends interviewing at least three ghostwriters to compare styles and chemistry. Embarking on such a big project is “a little like forming a long-term romantic relationship,” she says. Not that anything inappropriate will go on, but you’ll be working closely with this person over a period of months, she says. That’s tough to do when you can’t stand each other. An experienced ghostwriter will help you define the scope of the project, including the length of the manuscript and the components that will be included in the final manuscript. However, writing a book with a ghostwriter is a collaborative process, Turner says. You can’t just hire the writer and expect them to produce a book—guidance and input need to come from you, she says. So, be prepared to devote the time necessary for your part of the collaboration, which may take several months or more, she says. It’s a good idea to work on an outline first so you both understand the overall direction of the book and how you’ll organize the material. Your ghostwriter will likely want to have regular phone calls with you to get direction and input on the book’s contents. It’s important to define whether the ghost will also conduct additional research or need to provide other services, such as helping with graphics or photography sourcing or creating an index, which are not typically part of a ghostwriter’s responsibilities. While some companies claim they can deliver a finished book for a few thousand dollars or within a month or two, that’s not likely to be anything you’d want representing you or your brand, Bowman says. Good ghosts aren’t cheap: Bowman says the bottom-line number for a thorough book proposal, which is necessary for most writers to sell their books to publishing houses, from an experienced ghostwriter is somewhere around $5,000 to $8,000. When it comes to manuscripts, Glatzer estimates that less experienced ghostwriters fall into the $20,000 to $30,000 range, while intermediate-level ghosts can go as high as $50,000 or more. A-list writers with serious credentials can command upward of $75,000. “A small list of ghostwriters are consistently in the six-figure range,” she says. Be sure to define details such as the length of the book, how many rounds of revisions are included, and the charges that apply if the scope of work changes. The Editorial Freelancers Association, a membership organization for writers and editors, also publishes a list of rough editorial rate guidelines. Once you’ve reached an agreement on the project scope and budget, it’s critical to have an agreement that spells out the relationship. In addition to the specifics of the working relationship, it’s a good idea to work out who will hold the copyright to the material, Bowman says. Unless you have a written agreement that states otherwise, if you write the book together you typically both hold the copyright. Once you’ve hired your writer, set milestone deadlines to keep the project moving along and work together to refine information and voice. The ghostwriter and author relationship works best when it’s collaborative and open, Bowman says. Expect to have some back-and-forth, especially in the beginning—it’s unrealistic to expect the writer to get the tone and content perfect on the first draft. 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Ghostwriting Services Award-Winning/Bestselling Writers June, as dusk fell outside Tony Schwartz’s sprawling house, on a leafy back road in Riverdale, New York, he pulled out his laptop and caught up with the day’s big news: Donald J. As Schwartz watched a video of the speech, he began to feel personally implicated. Trump, facing a crowd that had gathered in the lobby of Trump Tower, on Fifth Avenue, laid out his qualifications, saying, “We need a leader that wrote ‘The Art of the Deal.’ ” If that was so, Schwartz thought, then he, not Trump, should be running. Schwartz dashed off a tweet: “Many thanks Donald Trump for suggesting I run for President, based on the fact that I wrote ‘The Art of the Deal.’ ”Schwartz had ghostwritten Trump’s 1987 breakthrough memoir, earning a joint byline on the cover, half of the book’s five-hundred-thousand-dollar advance, and half of the royalties. The book was a phenomenal success, spending forty-eight weeks on the best-seller list, thirteen of them at No. More than a million copies have been bought, generating several million dollars in royalties. The book expanded Trump’s renown far beyond New York City, making him an emblem of the successful tycoon. Edward Kosner, the former editor and publisher of , where Schwartz worked as a writer at the time, says, “Tony created Trump. Frankenstein.”Starting in late 1985, Schwartz spent eighteen months with Trump—camping out in his office, joining him on his helicopter, tagging along at meetings, and spending weekends with him at his Manhattan apartment and his Florida estate. During that period, Schwartz felt, he had got to know him better than almost anyone else outside the Trump family. Until Schwartz posted the tweet, though, he had not spoken publicly about Trump for decades. It had never been his ambition to be a ghostwriter, and he had been glad to move on. But, as he watched a replay of the new candidate holding forth for forty-five minutes, he noticed something strange: over the decades, Trump appeared to have convinced himself that he written the book. Schwartz recalls thinking, “If he could lie about that on Day One—when it was so easily refuted—he is likely to lie about anything.”It seemed improbable that Trump’s campaign would succeed, so Schwartz told himself that he needn’t worry much. But, as Trump denounced Mexican immigrants as “rapists,” near the end of the speech, Schwartz felt anxious. He had spent hundreds of hours observing Trump firsthand, and felt that he had an unusually deep understanding of what he regarded as Trump’s beguiling strengths and disqualifying weaknesses. Many Americans, however, saw Trump as a charmingly brash entrepreneur with an unfailing knack for business—a mythical image that Schwartz had helped create. “It pays to trust your instincts,” Trump says in the book, adding that he was set to make hundreds of millions of dollars after buying a hotel that he hadn’t even walked through. In the subsequent months, as Trump defied predictions by establishing himself as the front-runner for the Republican nomination, Schwartz’s desire to set the record straight grew. He had long since left journalism to launch the Energy Project, a consulting firm that promises to improve employees’ productivity by helping them boost their “physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual” morale. It was a successful company, with clients such as Facebook, and Schwartz’s colleagues urged him to avoid the political fray. It wasn’t because of Trump’s ideology—Schwartz doubted that he had one. The problem was Trump’s personality, which he considered pathologically impulsive and self-centered. Schwartz thought about publishing an article describing his reservations about Trump, but he hesitated, knowing that, since he’d cashed in on the flattering “Art of the Deal,” his credibility and his motives would be seen as suspect. Schwartz decided that if he kept mum and Trump was elected he’d never forgive himself. In June, he agreed to break his silence and give his first candid interview about the Trump he got to know while acting as his Boswell.“I put lipstick on a pig,” he said. “I feel a deep sense of remorse that I contributed to presenting Trump in a way that brought him wider attention and made him more appealing than he is.” He went on, “I genuinely believe that if Trump wins and gets the nuclear codes there is an excellent possibility it will lead to the end of civilization.”If he were writing “The Art of the Deal” today, Schwartz said, it would be a very different book with a very different title. Asked what he would call it, he answered, “The Sociopath.”The idea of Trump writing an autobiography didn’t originate with either Trump or Schwartz. It began with Si Newhouse, the media magnate whose company, Advance Publications, owned Random House at the time, and continues to own Condé Nast, the parent company of this magazine. “It was very definitely, and almost uniquely, Si Newhouse’s idea,” Peter Osnos, who edited the book, recalls. , which Condé Nast also owns, had published a cover story on Trump, and Newhouse noticed that newsstand sales had been unusually strong. Newhouse called Trump about the project, then visited him to discuss it. Random House continued the pursuit with a series of meetings. At one point, Howard Kaminsky, who ran Random House then, wrapped a thick Russian novel in a dummy cover that featured a photograph of Trump looking like a conquering hero; at the top was Trump’s name, in large gold block lettering. Kaminsky recalls that Trump was pleased by the mockup, but had one suggestion: “Please make my name much bigger.” After securing the half-million-dollar advance, Trump signed a contract. Around this time, Schwartz, who was one of the leading young magazine writers of the day, stopped by Trump’s office, in Trump Tower. In 1985, he’d published a piece in called “A Different Kind of Donald Trump Story,” which portrayed him not as a brilliant mogul but as a ham-fisted thug who had unsuccessfully tried to evict rent-controlled and rent-stabilized tenants from a building that he had bought on Central Park South. Trump’s efforts—which included a plan to house homeless people in the building in order to harass the tenants—became what Schwartz described as a “fugue of failure, a farce of fumbling and bumbling.” An accompanying cover portrait depicted Trump as unshaven, unpleasant-looking, and shiny with sweat. Yet, to Schwartz’s amazement, Trump loved the article. He hung the cover on a wall of his office, and sent a fan note to Schwartz, on his gold-embossed personal stationery. “Everybody seems to have read it,” Trump enthused in the note, which Schwartz has kept.“I was shocked,” Schwartz told me. “Trump didn’t fit any model of human being I’d ever met. He was obsessed with publicity, and he didn’t care what you wrote.” He went on, “Trump only takes two positions. Either you’re a scummy loser, liar, whatever, or you’re the greatest. He wanted to be seen as a tough guy, and he loved being on the cover.” Schwartz wrote him back, saying, “Of all the people I’ve written about over the years, you are certainly the best sport.”And so Schwartz had returned for more, this time to conduct an interview for . But to his frustration Trump kept making cryptic, monosyllabic statements. “He mysteriously wouldn’t answer my questions,” Schwartz said. After twenty minutes, he said, Trump explained that he didn’t want to reveal anything new about himself—he had just signed a lucrative book deal and needed to save his best material.“What kind of book? ” Schwartz said.“My autobiography,” Trump replied.“You’re only thirty-eight—you don’t have one yet! He knew that he would be making a Faustian bargain. ” Schwartz joked.“Yeah, I know,” Trump said.“If I were you,” Schwartz recalls telling him, “I’d write a book called ‘The Art of the Deal.’ something people would be interested in.”“You’re right,” Trump agreed. A lifelong liberal, he was hardly an admirer of Trump’s ruthless and single-minded pursuit of profit. “It was one of a number of times in my life when I was divided between the Devil and the higher side,” he told me. He had grown up in a bourgeois, intellectual family in Manhattan, and had attended élite private schools, but he was not as wealthy as some of his classmates—and, unlike many of them, he had no trust fund. “But my parents made it clear: ‘You’re on your own.’ ” Around the time Trump made his offer, Schwartz’s wife, Deborah Pines, became pregnant with their second daughter, and he worried that the family wouldn’t fit into their Manhattan apartment, whose mortgage was already too high. “I thought money would keep me safe and secure—or that was my rationalization.” At the same time, he knew that if he took Trump’s money and adopted Trump’s voice his journalism career would be badly damaged. He told Trump that if he would give him half the advance and half the book’s royalties he’d take the job. His heroes were such literary nonfiction writers as Tom Wolfe, John Mc Phee, and David Halberstam. Such terms are unusually generous for a ghostwriter. Literally, the term was invented to describe what I did.” Soon Schwartz thought that “The Art of the Deal” would be an easy project. Trump, despite having a reputation as a tough negotiator, agreed on the spot. The book’s structure would be simple: he’d chronicle half a dozen or so of Trump’s biggest real-estate deals, dispense some bromides about how to succeed in business, and fill in Trump’s life story. For research, he planned to interview Trump on a series of Saturday mornings. After Trump gave him a tour of his marble-and-gilt apartment atop Trump Tower—which, to Schwartz, looked unlived-in, like the lobby of a hotel—they began to talk. But the discussion was soon hobbled by what Schwartz regards as one of Trump’s most essential characteristics: “He has no attention span.”In those days, Schwartz recalls, Trump was generally affable with reporters, offering short, amusingly immodest quotes on demand. Trump had been forthcoming with him during the needed to provide him with sustained, thoughtful recollections. He asked Trump to describe his childhood in detail. After sitting for only a few minutes in his suit and tie, Trump became impatient and irritable. He looked fidgety, Schwartz recalls, “like a kindergartner who can’t sit still in a classroom.” Even when Schwartz pressed him, Trump seemed to remember almost nothing of his youth, and made it clear that he was bored. Far more quickly than Schwartz had expected, Trump ended the meeting. Schwartz tried to limit the sessions to smaller increments of time, but Trump’s contributions remained oddly truncated and superficial.“Trump has been written about a thousand ways from Sunday, but this fundamental aspect of who he is doesn’t seem to be fully understood,” Schwartz told me. “It’s implicit in a lot of what people write, but it’s never explicit—or, at least, I haven’t seen it. ” Schwartz trailed off, shaking his head in amazement. And that is that it’s impossible to keep him focussed on any topic, other than his own self-aggrandizement, for more than a few minutes, and even then . He regards Trump’s inability to concentrate as alarming in a Presidential candidate. That’s what I do.”But Schwartz believes that Trump’s short attention span has left him with “a stunning level of superficial knowledge and plain ignorance.” He said, “That’s why he so prefers TV as his first news source—information comes in easily digestible sound bites.” He added, “I seriously doubt that Trump has ever read a book straight through in his adult life.” During the eighteen months that he observed Trump, Schwartz said, he never saw a book on Trump’s desk, or elsewhere in his office, or in his apartment. “If he had to be briefed on a crisis in the Situation Room, it’s impossible to imagine him paying attention over a long period of time,” he said. Other journalists have noticed Trump’s apparent lack of interest in reading. In a recent phone interview, Trump told me that, to the contrary, he has the skill that matters most in a crisis: the ability to forge compromises. In May, Megyn Kelly, of Fox News, asked him to name his favorite book, other than the Bible or “The Art of the Deal.” Trump picked the 1929 novel “All Quiet on the Western Front.” Evidently suspecting that many years had elapsed since he’d read it, Kelly asked Trump to talk about the most recent book he’d read. The reason he touted “The Art of the Deal” in his announcement, he explained, was that he believes that recent Presidents have lacked his toughness and finesse: “Look at the trade deficit with China. “I read passages, I read areas, I’ll read chapters—I don’t have the time,” Trump said. As noted recently, this attitude is not shared by most U. Presidents, including Barack Obama, a habitual consumer of current books, and George W. Bush, who reportedly engaged in a fiercely competitive book-reading contest with his political adviser Karl Rove. Trump’s first wife, Ivana, famously claimed that Trump kept a copy of Adolf Hitler’s collected speeches, “My New Order,” in a cabinet beside his bed. “I thought he would find it interesting,” Davis told her. “Growing desperate, Schwartz devised a strategy for trapping Trump into giving more material. He made plans to spend the weekend with Trump at Mar-a-Lago, his mansion in Palm Beach, where there would be fewer distractions. As they chatted in the garden, Ivana icily walked by, clearly annoyed that Schwartz was competing for her husband’s limited free time. Long before lunch on Saturday, Schwartz recalls, Trump “essentially threw a fit.” He stood up and announced that he couldn’t stand any more questions. Schwartz went to his room, called his literary agent, Kathy Robbins, and told her that he couldn’t do the book. (Robbins confirms this.) As Schwartz headed back to New York, though, he came up with another plan. He would propose eavesdropping on Trump’s life by following him around on the job and, more important, by listening in on his office phone calls. That way, extracting extended reflections from Trump would not be required. When Schwartz presented the idea to Trump, he loved it. Almost every day from then on, Schwartz sat about eight feet away from him in the Trump Tower office, listening on an extension of Trump’s phone line. Schwartz says that none of the bankers, lawyers, brokers, and reporters who called Trump realized that they were being monitored. The calls usually didn’t last long, and Trump’s assistant facilitated the conversation-hopping. While he was talking with someone, she often came in with a Post-it note informing him of the next caller on hold.“He was playing people,” Schwartz recalls. On the phone with business associates, Trump would flatter, bully, and occasionally get mad, but always in a calculated way. Before the discussion ended, Trump would “share the news of his latest success,” Schwartz says. Instead of saying goodbye at the end of a call, Trump customarily signed off with “You’re the greatest! ” There was not a single call that Trump deemed too private for Schwartz to hear. “If he could have had three hundred thousand people listening in, he would have been even happier.”This year, Schwartz has heard some argue that there must be a more thoughtful and nuanced version of Donald Trump that he is keeping in reserve for after the campaign. “There is no private Trump.” This is not a matter of hindsight. While working on “The Art of the Deal,” Schwartz kept a journal in which he expressed his amazement at Trump’s personality, writing that Trump seemed driven entirely by a need for public attention. “All he is is ‘stomp, stomp, stomp’—recognition from outside, bigger, more, a whole series of things that go nowhere in particular,” he observed, on October 21, 1986. But, as he noted in the journal a few days later, “the book will be far more successful if Trump is a sympathetic character—even weirdly sympathetic—than if he is just hateful or, worse yet, a one-dimensional blowhard.”Eavesdropping solved the interview problem, but it presented a new one. After hearing Trump’s discussions about business on the phone, Schwartz asked him brief follow-up questions. He then tried to amplify the material he got from Trump by calling others involved in the deals. But their accounts often directly conflicted with Trump’s. “More than anyone else I have ever met, Trump has the ability to convince himself that whatever he is saying at any given moment is true, or sort of true, or at least to be true.” Often, Schwartz said, the lies that Trump told him were about money—“how much he had paid for something, or what a building he owned was worth, or how much one of his casinos was earning when it was actually on its way to bankruptcy.” Trump bragged that he paid only eight million dollars for Mar-a-Lago, but omitted that he bought a nearby strip of beach for a record sum. After gossip columns reported, erroneously, that Prince Charles was considering buying several apartments in Trump Tower, Trump implied that he had no idea where the rumor had started. (“It certainly didn’t hurt us,” he says, in “The Art of the Deal.”) Wayne Barrett, a reporter for the , later revealed that Trump himself had planted the story with journalists. Schwartz also suspected that Trump engaged in such media tricks, and asked him about a story making the rounds—that Trump often called up news outlets using a pseudonym. As Schwartz recalls, he smirked and said, “You like that, do you? He had a complete lack of conscience about it.” Since most people are “constrained by the truth,” Trump’s indifference to it “gave him a strange advantage.”When challenged about the facts, Schwartz says, Trump would often double down, repeat himself, and grow belligerent. This quality was recently on display after Trump posted on Twitter a derogatory image of Hillary Clinton that contained a six-pointed star lifted from a white-supremacist Web site. Campaign staffers took the image down, but two days later Trump angrily defended it, insisting that there was no anti-Semitic implication. People want to believe that something is the biggest and the greatest and the most spectacular. It’s an innocent form of exaggeration—and it’s a very effective form of promotion.” Schwartz now disavows the passage. In his journal, Schwartz describes the process of trying to make Trump’s voice palatable in the book. Whenever “the thin veneer of Trump’s vanity is challenged,” Schwartz says, he overreacts—not an ideal quality in a head of state. “Deceit,” he told me, is never “innocent.” He added, “ ‘Truthful hyperbole’ is a contradiction in terms. It was kind of “a trick,” he writes, to mimic Trump’s blunt, staccato, no-apologies delivery while making him seem almost boyishly appealing. Other people paint beautifully on canvas or write wonderful poetry. That’s how I get my kicks.” Schwartz now laughs at this depiction of Trump as a devoted artisan. “One of the most deep and basic needs he has is to prove that ‘I’m richer than you.’ ” As for the idea that making deals is a form of poetry, Schwartz says, “He was incapable of saying something like that—it wouldn’t even be in his vocabulary.” He saw Trump as driven not by a pure love of dealmaking but by an insatiable hunger for “money, praise, and celebrity.” Often, after spending the day with Trump, and watching him pile one hugely expensive project atop the next, like a circus performer spinning plates, Schwartz would go home and tell his wife, “He’s a living black hole! When Schwartz began writing “The Art of the Deal,” he realized that he needed to put an acceptable face on Trump’s loose relationship with the truth. Writing in Trump’s voice, he explained to the reader, “I play to people’s fantasies. One strategy was to make it appear that Trump was just having fun at the office. ”Schwartz reminded himself that he was being paid to tell Trump’s story, not his own, but the more he worked on the project the more disturbing he found it. “I try not to take any of what’s happened too seriously,” Trump says in the book. In his journal, he describes the hours he spent with Trump as “draining” and “deadening.” Schwartz told me that Trump’s need for attention is “completely compulsive,” and that his bid for the Presidency is part of a continuum. “The real excitement is playing the game.”In his journal, Schwartz wrote, “Trump stands for many of the things I abhor: his willingness to run over people, the gaudy, tacky, gigantic obsessions, the absolute lack of interest in anything beyond power and money.” Looking back at the text now, Schwartz says, “I created a character far more winning than Trump actually is.” The first line of the book is an example. “He’s managed to keep increasing the dose for forty years,” Schwartz said. After he’d spent decades as a tabloid titan, “the only thing left was running for President. If he could run for emperor of the world, he would.”Rhetorically, Schwartz’s aim in “The Art of the Deal” was to present Trump as the hero of every chapter, but, after looking into some of his supposedly brilliant deals, Schwartz concluded that there were cases in which there was no way to make Trump look good. So he sidestepped unflattering incidents and details. “I didn’t consider it my job to investigate,” he says. Schwartz also tried to avoid the strong whiff of cronyism that hovered over some deals. In his 1986 journal, he describes what a challenge it was to “put his best foot forward” in writing about one of Trump’s first triumphs: his development, starting in 1975, of the Grand Hyatt Hotel, on the site of the former Commodore Hotel, next to Grand Central Terminal. In order to afford the hotel, Trump required an extremely large tax abatement. Richard Ravitch, who was then in charge of the agency that had the authority to grant such tax breaks to developers, recalls that he declined to grant the abatement, and Trump got “so unpleasant I had to tell him to get out.” Trump got it anyway, largely because key city officials had received years of donations from his father, Fred Trump, who was a major real-estate developer in Queens. Wayne Barrett, whose reporting for the informed his definitive 1991 book, “Trump: The Deals and the Downfall,” says, “It was all Fred’s political connections that created the abatement.” In addition, Trump snookered rivals into believing that he had an exclusive option from the city on the project, when he didn’t. Trump also deceived his partner in the deal, Jay Pritzker, the head of the Hyatt Hotel chain. Pritzker had rejected an unfavorable term proposed by Trump, but at the closing Trump forced it through, knowing that Pritzker was on a mountain in Nepal and could not be reached. Schwartz wrote in his journal that “almost everything” about the hotel deal had “an immoral cast.” But as the ghostwriter he was “trying hard to find my way around” behavior that he considered “if not reprehensible, at least morally questionable.”Many tall tales that Trump told Schwartz contained a kernel of truth but made him out to be cleverer than he was. One of Trump’s favorite stories was about how he had tricked the company that owned Holiday Inn into becoming his partner in an Atlantic City casino. Trump claimed that he had quieted executives’ fears of construction delays by ordering his construction supervisor to make a vacant lot that he owned look like “the most active construction site in the history of the world.” As Trump tells it in “The Art of the Deal,” there were so many dump trucks and bulldozers pushing around dirt and filling holes that had just been dug that when Holiday Inn executives visited the site it “looked as if we were in the midst of building the Grand Coulee Dam.” The stunt, Trump claimed, pushed the deal through. After the book came out, though, a consultant for Trump’s casinos, Al Glasgow, who is now deceased, told Schwartz, “It never happened.” There may have been one or two trucks, but not the fleet that made it a great story. Schwartz tamped down some of Trump’s swagger, but plenty of it remained. The manuscript that Random House published was, depending on your perspective, either entertainingly insightful or shamelessly self-aggrandizing. To borrow a title from Norman Mailer, who frequently attended prizefights at Trump’s Atlantic City hotels, the book could have been called “Advertisements for Myself.”In 2005, Timothy L. O’Brien, an award-winning journalist who is currently the executive editor of Bloomberg View, published “Trump Nation,” a meticulous investigative biography. (Trump unsuccessfully sued him for libel.) O’Brien has taken a close look at “The Art of the Deal,” and he told me that it might be best characterized as a “nonfiction work of fiction.” Trump’s life story, as told by Schwartz, honestly chronicled a few setbacks, such as Trump’s disastrous 1983 purchase of the New Jersey Generals, a football team in the flailing United States Football League. But O’Brien believes that Trump used the book to turn almost every step of his life, both personal and professional, into a “glittering fable.”Some of the falsehoods in “The Art of the Deal” are minor. upended Trump’s claims that Ivana had been a “top model” and an alternate on the Czech Olympic ski team. Barrett notes that in “The Art of the Deal” Trump describes his father as having been born in New Jersey to Swedish parents; in fact, he was born in the Bronx to German parents. (Decades later, Trump spread falsehoods about Obama’s origins, claiming it was possible that the President was born in Africa.)In “The Art of the Deal,” Trump portrays himself as a warm family man with endless admirers. He praises Ivana’s taste and business skill—“I said you can’t bet against Ivana, and she proved me right.” But Schwartz noticed little warmth or communication between Trump and Ivana, and he later learned that while “The Art of the Deal” was being written Trump began an affair with Marla Maples, who became his second wife. (He divorced Ivana in 1992.) As far as Schwartz could tell, Trump spent very little time with his family and had no close friends. literally standing by you to the death.” Cohn, who in the fifties assisted Senator Joseph Mc Carthy in his vicious crusade against Communism, was closeted. In “The Art of the Deal,” Trump describes Roy Cohn, his personal lawyer, in the warmest terms, calling him “the sort of guy who’d be there at your hospital bed . He felt abandoned by Trump when he became fatally ill from , and said, “Donald pisses ice water.” Schwartz says of Trump, “He’d like people when they were helpful, and turn on them when they weren’t. He’s a transactional man—it was all about what you could do for him.”According to Barrett, among the most misleading aspects of “The Art of the Deal” was the idea that Trump made it largely on his own, with only minimal help from his father, Fred. Barrett, in his book, notes that Trump once declared, “The working man likes me because he knows I didn’t inherit what I’ve built,” and that in “The Art of the Deal” he derides wealthy heirs as members of “the Lucky Sperm Club.”Trump’s self-portrayal as a Horatio Alger figure has buttressed his populist appeal in 2016. Fred’s fortune, based on his ownership of middle-income properties, wasn’t glamorous, but it was sizable: in 2003, a few years after Fred died, Trump and his siblings reportedly sold some of their father’s real-estate holdings for half a billion dollars. In “The Art of the Deal,” Trump cites his father as “the most important influence on me,” but in his telling his father’s main legacy was teaching him the importance of “toughness.” Beyond that, Schwartz says, Trump “barely talked about his father—he didn’t want his success to be seen as having anything to do with him.” But when Barrett investigated he found that Trump’s father was instrumental in his son’s rise, financially and politically. In the book, Trump says that “my energy and my enthusiasm” explain how, as a twenty-nine-year-old with few accomplishments, he acquired the Grand Hyatt Hotel. Barrett reports, however, that Trump’s father had to co-sign the many contracts that the deal required. He also lent Trump seven and a half million dollars to get started as a casino owner in Atlantic City; at one point, when Trump couldn’t meet payments on other loans, his father tried to tide him over by sending a lawyer to buy some three million dollars’ worth of gambling chips. Barrett told me, “Donald did make some smart moves himself, particularly in assembling the site for the Trump Tower. That was a stroke of genius.” Nonetheless, he said, “The notion that he’s a self-made man is a joke. But I guess they couldn’t call the book ‘The Art of My Father’s Deals.’ ”The other key myth perpetuated by “The Art of the Deal” was that Trump’s intuitions about business were almost flawless. “The book helped fuel the notion that he couldn’t fail,” Barrett said. But, unbeknown to Schwartz and the public, by late 1987, when the book came out, Trump was heading toward what Barrett calls “simultaneous personal and professional self-destruction.” O’Brien agrees that during the next several years Trump’s life unravelled. The divorce from Ivana reportedly cost him twenty-five million dollars. Meanwhile, he was in the midst of what O’Brien calls “a crazy shopping spree that resulted in unmanageable debt.” He was buying the Plaza Hotel and also planning to erect “the tallest building in the world,” on the former rail yards that he had bought on the West Side. In 1987, the city denied him permission to construct such a tall skyscraper, but in “The Art of the Deal” he brushed off this failure with a one-liner: “I can afford to wait.” O’Brien says, “The reality is that he afford to wait. He was telling the media that the carrying costs were three million dollars, when in fact they were more like twenty million.” Trump was also building a third casino in Atlantic City, the Taj, which he promised would be “the biggest casino in history.” He bought the Eastern Air Lines shuttle that operated out of New York, Boston, and Washington, rechristening it the Trump Shuttle, and acquired a giant yacht, the Trump Princess. “He was on a total run of complete and utter self-absorption,” Barrett says, adding, “It’s kind of like now.”Schwartz said that when he was writing the book “the greatest percentage of Trump’s assets was in casinos, and he made it sound like each casino was more successful than the last. But every one of them was failing.” He went on, “I think he was just spinning. I don’t think he could have believed it at the time. He had to have been terrified.”In 1992, the journalist David Cay Johnston published a book about casinos, “Temples of Chance,” and cited a net-worth statement from 1990 that assessed Trump’s personal wealth. It showed that Trump owed nearly three hundred million dollars more to his creditors than his assets were worth. The next year, his company was forced into bankruptcy—the first of six such instances. But in “The Art of the Deal,” O’Brien told me, “Trump shrewdly and unabashedly promoted an image of himself as a dealmaker nonpareil who could always get the best out of every situation—and who can now deliver America from its malaise.” This idealized version was presented to an exponentially larger audience, O’Brien noted, when Mark Burnett, the reality-television producer, read “The Art of the Deal” and decided to base a new show on it, “The Apprentice,” with Trump as the star. The first season of the show, which premièred in 2004, opens with Trump in the back of a limousine, boasting, “I’ve mastered the art of the deal, and I’ve turned the name Trump into the highest-quality brand.” An image of the book’s cover flashes onscreen as Trump explains that, as the “master,” he is now seeking an apprentice. O’Brien said, “ ‘The Apprentice’ is mythmaking on steroids. There’s a straight line from the book to the show to the 2016 campaign.”It took Schwartz a little more than a year to write “The Art of the Deal.” In the spring of 1987, he sent the manuscript to Trump, who returned it to him shortly afterward. 1 best-seller, and one of the best-selling business books of all time. There were a few red marks made with a fat-tipped Magic Marker, most of which deleted criticisms that Trump had made of powerful individuals he no longer wanted to offend, such as Lee Iacocca. Some say it was the best-selling business book ever.” (It is not.) Howard Kaminsky, the former Random House head, laughed and said, “Trump didn’t write a postcard for us! Otherwise, Schwartz says, Trump changed almost nothing. ”Trump was far more involved in the book’s promotion. In my phone interview with Trump, he initially said of Schwartz, “Tony was very good. He wooed booksellers and made one television appearance after another. He was the co-author.” But he dismissed Schwartz’s account of the writing process. He publicly promised to donate his cut of the book’s royalties to charity. He even made a surprise trip to New Hampshire, where he stirred additional publicity by floating the possibility that he might run for President. In December of 1987, a month after the book was published, Trump hosted an extravagant book party in the pink marble atrium of Trump Tower. Klieg lights lit a red carpet outside the building. Inside, nearly a thousand guests, in black tie, were served champagne and fed slices of a giant cake replica of Trump Tower, which was wheeled in by a parade of women waving red sparklers. The boxing promoter Don King greeted the crowd in a floor-length mink coat, and the comedian Jackie Mason introduced Donald and Ivana with the words “Here comes the king and queen! ” Trump toasted Schwartz, saying teasingly that he had at least tried to teach him how to make money. Schwartz got more of an education the next day, when he and Trump spoke on the phone. After chatting briefly about the party, Trump informed Schwartz that, as his ghostwriter, he owed him for half the event’s cost, which was in the six figures. “He wanted me to split the cost of entertaining his list of nine hundred second-rate celebrities? ” Schwartz had, in fact, learned a few things from watching Trump. He drastically negotiated down the amount that he agreed to pay, to a few thousand dollars, and then wrote Trump a letter promising to write a check not to Trump but to a charity of Schwartz’s choosing. In the past seven years, Trump has promised to give millions of dollars to charity, but reporters for the Washington Not long after the discussion of the party bills, Trump approached Schwartz about writing a sequel, for which Trump had been offered a seven-figure advance. This time, however, he offered Schwartz only a third of the profits. He pointed out that, because the advance was much bigger, the payout would be, too. Feeling deeply alienated, he instead wrote a book called “What Really Matters,” about the search for meaning in life. After working with Trump, Schwartz writes, he felt a “gnawing emptiness” and became a “seeker,” longing to “be connected to something timeless and essential, more real.”Schwartz told me that he has decided to pledge all royalties from sales of “The Art of the Deal” in 2016 to pointedly chosen charities: the National Immigration Law Center, Human Rights Watch, the Center for the Victims of Torture, the National Immigration Forum, and the Tahirih Justice Center. “I’ll carry this until the end of my life,” he said. But I like the idea that, the more copies that ‘The Art of the Deal’ sells, the more money I can donate to the people whose rights Trump seeks to abridge.”Schwartz expected Trump to attack him for speaking out, and he was correct. I helped him when he didn’t have two cents in his pocket. I guess he thinks it’s good for him—but he’ll find out it’s not good for him.”Minutes after Trump got off the phone with me, Schwartz’s cell phone rang. “I just talked to —which, by the way, is a failing magazine that no one reads—and I heard you were critical of me.”“You’re running for President,” Schwartz said. Informed that Schwartz had made critical remarks about him, and wouldn’t be voting for him, Trump said, “He’s probably just doing it for the publicity.” He also said, “Wow. “I disagree with a lot of what you’re saying.”“That’s your right, but then you should have just remained silent. I just want to tell you that I think you’re very disloyal. I had a lot of choice of who to have write the book, and I chose you, and I was very generous with you. I know that you gave a lot of speeches and lectures using ‘The Art of the Deal.’ I could have sued you, but I didn’t.”“My business has nothing to do with ‘The Art of the Deal.’ ”“That’s not what I’ve been told.”“You’re running for President of the United States. The stakes here are high.”“Yeah, they are,” he said. Schwartz can understand why Trump feels stung, but he felt that he had to speak up before it was too late. As for Trump’s anger toward him, he said, “I don’t take it personally, because the truth is he didn’t mean it personally. Nov 16, 2017. Choose Kevin Anderson & Associates because you deserve the very best ghostwriting service in the industry. Our firm gives you the rare opportunity to work with a team of New York Times bestselling authors, editors, and publishing insiders who will guide you through every step of the ghostwriting process.

Best Ghostwriting Services To Buy Online Fiverr A ghostwriter, I’m about to air your dirty laundry for all to see. The thing is, ghostwriting has become one of those “popular careers” that lacks a firm standard of ethics and often draws out people who just want an easy fix for their professional woes. I’ve run into many a ghostwriter whose ambition far outstrips her talent, so people searching for ghostwriters need to know how to protect themselves. The following eleven statements are true of every ghostwriter, but you need to be on the lookout. And if you are considering a career in ghostwriting, these are the things you’ll want to avoid. Most ghostwriters—even those with immense talent and potential—don’t take the time to increase their knowledge of the industry. This is dangerous for all ghostwriting clients, especially since most of you actually want to see your manuscript in print. Just the other day, I stumbled across a ghostwriter’s web site that claimed the writer had “extensive contacts” with literary agents and New York publishers. The first red flag was the have friends in high places, this fact doesn’t help the client. No self-respecting agent or editor is going to trust a ghostwriter who pimps out every one of his or her clients. A ghostwriter you can trust is one who is honest about his qualifications. He’ll admit that he reads up on industry news, follows publishing trends, tracks articles published by editors and agents. But he won’t try to sell his relationships because , and not PR, is the name of the game. When I was working as a ghostwriter, it always bothered me when I came across competitors who claimed “dozens of sales” to publishers and “over 100 books in print”. And by the time the fourth went to print, I was ready to strike out on my own as an author. My ghostwriting career lasted about five years, and during that time four of my clients sold manuscripts I’d written or edited. Statistically, most ghostwritten manuscripts either never make it to print or are self-published. In fact, many of my clients hired me specifically because they wanted to self-publish, and although I’m not a big fan of POD publishing, who was I to judge? The thing is, most ghostwriters choose this career because they can’t get published themselves. If you manage to hire a ghostwriter whose prose is flawless, whose plot development shines, you’re very lucky indeed. There are, of course, exceptions to the rule, but you’re not paying a best-selling novelist to write your manuscript. Instead, you’re hiring a ghost whose writing abilities exceed your own. So if your ghostwriter is claiming multiple sales to publishers, ask for proof. At the beginning of my ghostwriting career, I took every project offered me, sometimes even when the client’s opinions drastically clashed with mine. As I increased my reputation, however, I began choosing my projects more carefully, and the change was dramatic. Your ghostwriter should be honest when expressing feelings about your manuscript idea, especially if the topic is controversial. The problem is, you can’t always tell if the feelings expressed are genuine. I’d tell you to avoid ghostwriters who gush unnecessarily over your idea, but I’ve been known to get overenthusiastic myself if a client proposes a project that really jazzes me. Ask for a telephone conversation so you can judge the ghostwriter’s opinions more easily. Ghostwriters, just like other professionals, need a way to prove that they are capable of handling projects offered by new clients. Consequently, they disclose the nature of the work they’ve performed for you, and might even provide excerpts from your project to new clients. The problem is that some ghostwriters won’t disclose this to you, which is a breach of your rights. By definition, a ghostwriter works in secret, and the fact that he or she wrote your manuscript should never be made public. Using excerpts in a portfolio is acceptable, but only under certain conditions. First, your ghostwriter should obtain a non-disclosure agreement (NDA) from anyone to whom your working relationship is revealed. This means that your ghostwriter’s prospective clients agree not to share privileged information with anyone else. Second, you should be told whenever your manuscript is used in a portfolio. The only exception is if the client has agreed to place the ghostwriter’s name on the finished product, such as in a shared byline. A ghostwriter who breaches confidentiality without your knowledge is not a professional. An increasing number of ghostwriters are contracting their services out to other professionals, sometimes writers who are not as skillful or as experienced. If you think the telephone company is the only one engaged in outsourcing, you’re kidding yourself. This is most common in ghostwriting businesses that label themselves as “firms” or “companies”. A ghostwriter working alone is probably doing all of the writing, but if you go with a larger organization, there’s no telling who actually writes your manuscript. This isn’t a problem if the final product meets your expectations, but what if it doesn’t? You were lured into the contract with samples of one writer’s work, then handed substandard material by another. Chances are, you won’t have any options at that point. To protect yourself in this situation, make sure the actual writer’s name is in the contract, and look for language that specifies who will actually be working on the project. This isn’t a guarantee, but it’s better than nothing. Did you know that the ghostwriter who pens your manuscript might not even speak English as his or her first language? Outsourcing is popular, but a growing number of ghostwriting firms are working with people in India and other countries to save a buck and increase volume. Some writers in foreign nations will work for as little as $0.50 an hour, which means the thousands of dollars you pay for ghostwriting is lining the pockets of an unscrupulous intermediary. Again, your contract should spell out who is ghosting your manuscript. There is no set industry standard for ghostwriting fees; therefore, price quotes widely vary between professionals. I never accepted less than $10,000 for a single full-length manuscript as a ghostwriter, but I knew other writers who routinely worked for less than half that figure. If you insist on paying a ghostwriter peanuts for his or her work, the final product will not meet your expectations. This doesn’t mean that you have to overpay, but it does mean that you need to provide adequate compensation to your ghostwriter. The product will be better and your ghostwriter will be happy to take your calls in the future. The flipside to the previous point is the fact that ghostwriters are usually more than willing to work with their clients on price. For example, some ghostwriters will offer a hybrid service; they’ll help you write portions of your manuscript while overseeing your completion of the rest. It is true that you’ll spend big bucks to hire a ghostwriter to write a full-length novel, but you do have options. Ask your ghostwriter about services that will help you save money while still getting the project done. Like anyone else, ghostwriters have their own set of obligations, biases and alliances. This means that the recommendations your ghostwriter offers concerning your manuscript might be in their his best interests, but not in yours. A ghostwriter is not a publisher, editor, literary agent or book marketer, though some might have skills in this area. It is best to compartmentalize the production of your manuscript; solicit one professional for the writing, one for the selling, one for the marketing, and so on. When hiring a ghostwriter, look over that contract carefully. Many ghostwriters do not hire lawyers to draw up their agreements, and instead write them for themselves. This means that it might contain language that is potentially harmful to your project. For example, does the contract specifically state that the copyright to the material is yours upon payment? Does it spell out the payment agreement in a definitive manner? Make sure that the contract is one you can live with. Unfortunately, many ghostwriting clients just sign whatever document they are handed—and regret it later. This one should be common sense, but you’d be surprised how many of my ghostwriting clients have thought, at one time or another, that I was infallible. I’ve received countless angry e-mails from clients complaining about a misspelled word or a forgotten exclamation point, shocked that a could make such simple mistakes. The manuscript you are handed at the end of the project won’t be perfect, and you might even need to hire an editor to clean it up before you start the submission process. It’s no different from any regular writer penning his or her own manuscript. That said, your ghostwriter should be willing to admit his or her mistakes, and correct them where appropriate. Don’t expect perfection, but don’t settle for substandard material. These eleven points are designed to help you search for an appropriate ghostwriter, not to scare you off from the arrangement entirely. The fact is, there are scrupulous, reputable ghostwriters in the market—and then there’s the . When hiring a ghostwriter, engage in a thorough vetting process. Not only should he or she be competent and experienced, but also the right fit for your project. Best ghostwriting freelance services online. Outsource your ghostwriting project and get it quickly done and delivered remotely online.

Best Ghostwriters For Hire In March 2018 - Upwork™ Writer4me employs a creative team of qualified and bestseller writers, ghost writers, awarded developers and nation’s best legal experts. All your writing, web development, SEO, legal, virtual assistant and designing solutions under one roof. World’s most popular ghost writer service (source: Alexa.com) Genuinely cost-effective solutions. Experience of working with BBC & National Geographic. Secured site, for online payments (secured by COMODO). Large number of satisfied customers across 49 nations. For large ghostwriting, fiction and screenplay projects worth over $1,000 sign contract and ask for installment payment facility. Hire experienced ghost writers today. Post your ghost writing projects for free and connect with professional writers from around the world.

Things Your Ghostwriter Doesn't Want You to Know Sam Tamlyn Little ghost in sheet with pencil pointing to right. Cole is on the Internet since 2003 doing book ghostwriting and book ghost writing for those who understand that either affordable or bestselling freelance writing works. also works on scripts, screenplays, video work, film and TV, music and lyrics. " data-medium-file="https://i0com/ghostwriterbook.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Ghost-Writer-Inc-logo.jpg? fit=240,240&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0com/ghostwriterbook.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Ghost-Writer-Inc-logo.jpg? " data-medium-file="https://i1com/ghostwriterbook.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/ghostwriter-with-caption-e1454637810376.jpg? fit=178,209&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i1com/ghostwriterbook.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/ghostwriter-with-caption-e1454637810376.jpg? fit=178,209&ssl=1" src="https://i1com/ghostwriterbook.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/ghostwriter-with-caption-e1454637810376.jpg? w=186&h=218&crop&ssl=1" width="186" height="218" data-original-width="186" data-original-height="218" itemprop=" title="Book Ghostwriter" alt="book ghostwriter on google" style="width: 186px; height: 218px;" /New York Times bestseller ghostwriter – also Amazon bestselling ghostwriter and editor Karen S. Cole – text or call me, I’m here weekdays mostly: 425.205.9707 or [email protected], PROFESSIONAL BOOK GHOST WRITING. This matters to you as a newbie manuscript writer or published book author. I am a I’m well-known within certain publishing circles. I work with select newbie clients for only $5,000 to $25,000 USD. It’s on up to $50,000 USD (for other celebrity-oriented members of our team) per 50-400 page manuscript. We work for far less for editing, book doctoring, coaching, and developmental rewriting projects. If you're thinking about hiring a ghostwriter, it's best you get the skinny straight from the horse's mouth. Unfortunately, if you are a ghostwriter. An increasing number of ghostwriters are contracting their services out to other professionals, sometimes writers who are not as skillful or as experienced. If you think the telephone.

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Things Your Ghostwriter Doesn't Want You to Know Sam Tamlyn Little ghost in sheet with pencil pointing to right. Cole is on the Internet since 2003 doing book ghostwriting and book ghost writing for those who understand that either affordable or bestselling freelance writing works. also works on scripts, screenplays, video work, film and TV, music and lyrics. " data-medium-file="https://i0com/ghostwriterbook.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Ghost-Writer-Inc-logo.jpg? fit=240,240&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i0com/ghostwriterbook.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Ghost-Writer-Inc-logo.jpg? " data-medium-file="https://i1com/ghostwriterbook.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/ghostwriter-with-caption-e1454637810376.jpg? fit=178,209&ssl=1" data-large-file="https://i1com/ghostwriterbook.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/ghostwriter-with-caption-e1454637810376.jpg? fit=178,209&ssl=1" src="https://i1com/ghostwriterbook.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/ghostwriter-with-caption-e1454637810376.jpg? w=186&h=218&crop&ssl=1" width="186" height="218" data-original-width="186" data-original-height="218" itemprop=" title="Book Ghostwriter" alt="book ghostwriter on google" style="width: 186px; height: 218px;" /New York Times bestseller ghostwriter – also Amazon bestselling ghostwriter and editor Karen S. Cole – text or call me, I’m here weekdays mostly: 425.205.9707 or [email protected], PROFESSIONAL BOOK GHOST WRITING. This matters to you as a newbie manuscript writer or published book author. I am a I’m well-known within certain publishing circles. I work with select newbie clients for only ,000 to ,000 USD. It’s on up to ,000 USD (for other celebrity-oriented members of our team) per 50-400 page manuscript. We work for far less for editing, book doctoring, coaching, and developmental rewriting projects. If you're thinking about hiring a ghostwriter, it's best you get the skinny straight from the horse's mouth. Unfortunately, if you are a ghostwriter. An increasing number of ghostwriters are contracting their services out to other professionals, sometimes writers who are not as skillful or as experienced. If you think the telephone.

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